Worlds Busiest Real Estate Agent in the World!

Hey guys, Ten Volt here – World’s busiest real estate agent in the world – and I’ve got something exciting to share with you. I’ve started to ‘vlog’ or ‘Video Blog’ despite my busy schedule. How do I handle it you ask? I do it in my car. I’m hardcore.

Remember, if you need a condo, a townhouse or just advice on how to live in a luxury car, you give me a call. Ten Volt is here for you and I’ve got car payments to make. Follow me on the twitter or drop me a comment on the youtube. Be safe and wear your seatbelt.

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Jack
Guest
Jack

Awesome video clip!

asia man
Guest
asia man

too funny.

william
Guest
william

I'm just in from the UK but prices seem to be overpriced here and property has already dropped off over there and someone said China is going down too. Think I'll just rent for now and see what happens. Its getting tough in the UK and europe is in so much dept. When is the rain going to stop its worse than the UK!

specialfx3000
Member
specialfx3000

LOL, thanks for the laugh to start the week.

Look forward to a helicopter version.

Anonymouse
Guest
Anonymouse

@william:

"I’m just in from the UK but prices seem to be overpriced here"

The exchange rate doesn't help. 5 years ago when it was $2.35 to the pound you might have thought a little differently.

Troll
Guest
Troll

Wow. Sad Video.

jesse
Member

Vancouver Sun: <a href="http://www.vancouversun.com/news/projecting+billion+deficit+2011/5778568/story.html&quot; rel="nofollow">B.C. projecting $3.1 billion deficit for 2011-12

British Columbia is projecting a $3.1 billion deficit for 2011-12, Finance Minister Kevin Falcon announced this morning.

The amount is $313 million worse than the estimate he gave three months ago.

The forecast reflects a $303-million decrease in revenue, mainly due to lower corporate income tax revenues, the impact of lower commodity prices on natural resource revenue, and reduced net income projections from commercial Crown corporations, according to a news release.

At the bottom of the story: "more to come"

Hmmmm… indeed…

Troll
Guest
Troll

"Is home ownership really a smart investment?"

http://www.thestar.com/article/1091881–is-home-o

James McKellar, director of the real estate and infrastructure program at York University’s Schulich School of Business.

“Calling a house a good investment is a process of rationalization. The last thing you want to admit is that, ‘I bought the house because I fell in love with it.’”

followed by "He now owns a home in Moore Park". D'oh.

jesse
Member
James Hamilton: Worries continue The Ted spread continues to edge up and is back above 50 basis points. This measures the difference between 3-month Libor (a rate at which banks lend Eurodollars to each other) and the 3-month U.S. T-bill rate. The gap indicates a modest increase in concerns about lending to European banks, though still nowhere near the level in the fall of 2008. But if a bank wants to borrow in euros rather than Eurodollars, it pays a stiffer premium, as indicated by the spread between the 3-month Euribor and overnight EONIA rates. That difference between the euro and Eurodollar risk premium is interesting. One interpretation is that the Fed has done an adequate job of keeping the interbank market liquid, while the ECB has not. Another possibility is that the European bank to which you lend may… Read more »
Ten Volt
Guest

@Troll: Don't make me pull this car over.

patriotz
Member

@Troll:

Confusing and nebulous. Two pages that don't make the point as well as one sentence – a house is only a smart investment if buying is cheaper than renting.

Anonymouse
Guest
Anonymouse

@jesse:

I think the Eurozone was always doomed to failure. Just think about how many new countries have formed there in the last 30 years and ask yourself how they considered that all these people could ever have been happy under one economic policy. When countries with small populations such as Belgium can't even seem to find a common ground on domestic policies (think back to 2007-2008) you really have to wonder what they were thinking.

But that said, I can't see it disappearing any time soon – France and Germany have too much to lose to let that happen.

Many Franks
Guest

OK, OK, I'll bite. Well done, Ten Volt.
http://realestateagentsincars.tumblr.com/post/134

This isn't the first comedy entry in the set, incidentally. That award went to Ian Su:
http://realestateagentsincars.tumblr.com/post/111

While we're on this slippery slope, our first agent not actually in a car was Randy Dodd:
http://realestateagentsincars.tumblr.com/post/132

…closely followed by Randy Clarke, who was so eager to get into his car that he seemed more than willing to abandon his camera and tripod:
http://realestateagentsincars.tumblr.com/post/133

…but you, Ten Volt, are our first (unambiguously) nonhuman entry.

Many Franks
Guest

@Many Franks: (Make that second Randy a Larry.)

registered
Member
registered

8 Troll Says: "followed by “He now owns a home in Moore Park”. D’oh."

And that matters why? Buying on emotion is fine when it's done in full knowledge of the potential consequences. No self-contradiction at all. We're discussing something else: Vancouver buyers.

Full credit is still due to some of the earliest online astroturfers who worked the "best place on earth" argument for years, holding that the rich beyond care of loss or profit were buying up Vancouver out of pure love for the place. They understood from the start that justifications based on economic reasoning were quicksand.

Makaya
Member
Makaya
@DEFAULT NAMEe: "you really have to wonder what they were thinking" or maybe you should open History books and understand why Europe is where it is at today… The situation is definitely difficult now, but as far as I know, the Euro is not a failure yet if I judge it by its exchange rate with the US. Fundamentally, the Eurozone as a whole is in better shape economically than the US (see Fitch negative outlook for US today). It would only take a few words from Merkel ("Let's print eurobonds") for this mess to maybe not disappear but at least seriously diminish. We'll get there before the greeks are kicked out of the eurozone. What we're witnessing now is a gigantic political drama that aims at putting pressure on "club med" countries to do the structural reforms that are… Read more »
patriotz
Member

@fixie guy:

If he bought the Toronto house (Moore Park is in Leaside) after selling the one in Boston, that would be at or near the bottom of the 90's bust.

Although it would it appear he simply got lucky on that one.

Kingston
Guest
Kingston

I think they should start mailing out fines for unsafe driving to all those realtors who record videos while they drive.

patriotz
Member

@Makaya:

"it doesn’t take a Phd to understand that cutting expenses and increasing revenues is the only way to get out of this mess."

No, because no matter what they do the most indebted countries (e.g. Greece, probably Ireland) will not be able to pay off their Euro debts. Their economies cannot grow enough to do it. They will probably end up defaulting explicitly (which Greece has already done partially) or implicitly by leaving the Euro and devaluing.

oneangryslav2
Guest
oneangryslav2

@Makaya:

The person effectively running Greece today is a German guy called Horst Reichenbach.

Everything old is new again, and Greece has come full circle. Effectively ruled by a German today, after the modern Greek state had won independence from the Ottoman Empire, the first Greek monarch was, you guessed it, a German–the Bavarian, Otto of Wittelsbach.

Makaya
Member
Makaya

@patriotz: I might be wrong, but I don't believe that Greece will leave the euro. I agree Greece can't possibly re-pay its debt, but it's the case for pretty much the all developed economies… It doesn't mean necessarily that it's the end of the Euro or that Greece will be kicked out of the Eurozone.

Did you know that if Japan sees an increase of 1% on its debt, the amount they'll have to pay on interest will be greater than what its revenue…? Also, have you watched Peter Schiff jokingly saying "Of Course We're Not Going To Pay Back The Chinese"? (http://youtu.be/HStFXa63Ghk).

The best presentation on the current economy I've seen so far was from Kyle Bass (http://youtu.be/WWgtzwqWh60). Pretty depressing, but as he said "I'm paid to be a realist".

Troll
Guest
Troll

@fixie guy:

And that matters why? Buying on emotion is fine when it’s done in full knowledge of the potential consequences. No self-contradiction at all.

I love your comments, pure gold, thanks for the chuckle. So it doesn't bother you that a supposed academic RE expert is willing to pay $10K/year extra (his own numbers) for his perceived intagible benefits of owning? This after he's been burned twice already in the housing market? I guess I shouldn't be surprised that you respect his views.

Anonymouse
Guest
Anonymouse

@Makaya:

"maybe you should open History books and understand why Europe is where it is at today…"

Seriously? I brought up the point I did BECAUSE of the history. There are still intense feelings of distrust between many countries, some of which go back centuries. Look at Greece vs Turkey when it comes to Cyprus, how the UK feels about France's farming subsidies, or Hungary vs Slovakia when it comes to citizenship. It's incredibly unlikely that all these people can remain in a stable Union indefinitely. Especially when countries like Norway are seen to be prospering without membership.

Troll
Guest
Troll

@Makaya:

I agree Greece can’t possibly re-pay its debt, but it’s the case for pretty much the all developed economies

But nobody is talking about Greece paying off the credit card in full(or any other country for that matter). The issue is whether they have the ability to continuing making their minimum monthly payments.

jesse
Member

@Troll: The issue is whether they have the ability to continuing making their minimum monthly payments.

The bigger issue is if they can even survive that currency agreement without said credit card.

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