2013: Everything costs more

Well, maybe not everything…

You can probably pay less for a computer or a house, but many of the day-to-day expenses of living are going up around here.

As the new year rolled over there was a spate of announcement for rising taxes, user fees, premiums and fares in BC.

In Vancouver, homeowners will pay about three per cent more in 2013 on their property taxes and utility bills.

The cost of health care premiums is set to rise in the province, from $128 to $133 per month for a family, adding up to $60 per year, according to the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

“Most of us would say, ‘OK, we can squeeze out five dollars a month somewhere,’ ” said spokesman Jordan Bateman.

But, he added, this is the fourth January premiums have increased and “it’s really starting to weigh down taxpayers.”

Federally, Employment Insurance and Canada Pension premiums will also increase.

Workers who make over $47,400 will pay $891, up $51 from last year, and employers will pay $1,247 in EI premiums, up $72. Workers and employers will both pay an extra $49 in CPP premiums, with workers paying $2,356 in 2013.

The cost of getting around is also going up.

Yep, Translink fares are going up too – a one zone fare goes from $2.50 to $2.75.  Also Tolls and BC Ferry fare.

For the whole list check out the original article in the Vancouver Sun.

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

……Noon News Hour – Property values dropping
Wed, Jan 2: For the first time in many years, a “significant number” of properties in Vancouver’s Sea to Sky region are decreasing in value…..

Whistler’s been dropping for about 11 years now. Way to scoop that story Global!

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

….While nationally ownership rate is about 71%, in Vancouver (Van proper anyways) it is closer to 50%, reflecting the very high price of ownership and low wages (and lots of apartment units)….

So if this is true, where in Canada, since 70% already own, are all these inter-provincial migrants coming from? (I know there isn’t any net incoming migration) I guess we’re to believe that they’re all selling their homes to move to Vancouver to pay high rents (since they couldn’t possibly afford to own here)? Just goes to underscore how much this fart bubble is supported by bullshit.

What’s the difference between a Real Estate board and the back end of a bull? Eventually the bull drops the bullshit.

Absinthe
Member
Absinthe

Anon @98 – Private institutions aren’t mainstreaming special needs students. In the main schools, you’ll have one or more sometimes profoundly high-need people in each classroom, each with a half- or full- time care aide. If you get to pick your students, you can specialize. And whether that’s for ESL, gifted, academic, monied, special needs, artistic, or ballet… well, in specialization there are savings. Our public school system is necessarily generalist, and each classroom is dealing with a range of students. ( I’m a parent with kids in elementary. )

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

“Except that the US and the UK have a large number of their students educated in private institutions. Canada has a non-trivial number of private schools too.”

And which provide the better education? Then factor in the private institutions have a lower true cost per student.

Crikey
Guest
Crikey
Health care, education, real estate, … Oh my! Real Estate already has no brain, heart, and few used house salespersons with the courage to be truthful (So I wonder health care and real estate are missing?) OMG – an epiphany: Cameron Muir is the little awkward man behind the Global TV real estate curtains! Anyways, now a weak stab at tying it all together — It is time that health care and education were means-tested. However, as others have noted there are many curious cases of young families living in million dollar homes but having very little yearly income. So, how about means-tested fees according to the value of the primary residence which you (or your guardians, if not an adult) own. That means your satellite parents can’t just fly you in from Faroffistan, buy you a luxury condo, drop… Read more »
oneangryslav2
Guest
oneangryslav2
@71 Name Taken: I want to thank you for your responses to some of the points I made. Not because I think they’re thoughtful or intellectually engaging, but because I can now avoid debating you in this forum without feeling like I’m missing out. A couple of final points, nonetheless: “Why not follow your logic and eliminate private sector at all?” My mother, a wonderful woman with the biggest heart in the world, and a smart woman as well, did not, however, have the opportunity to receive much education. The first time she heard the phrase reduction ad absurdum was from me when I was about 18 or 19 and had just taken an Intro to Philosophy class at UBC. Anyway, it was January on a day much like today; that is to say, not too cold but still chilly… Read more »
Just Looking
Guest

@Anonymous

“The reason we have not seen efficiencies in things like traditional education (grade 1 to 12 / university) is because government controls it.”

Except that the US and the UK have a large number of their students educated in private institutions. Canada has a non-trivial number of private schools too. In decades of operation, those institutions haven’t provided the productivity improvements that one would expect if the only thing stopping innovation was the fact that schools were government-run.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Re Eduction:

Does the 1 teacher in front of 30 kids for 5 hours per day Mon to Fri 9 months per year make sense anymore? Do printed text books make sense? Does marking papers by hand make sense? Does utilizing
a school classroom for about 10% of the year make sense? I think we will see massive changes in education in coming years utilizing technology. An iPad can probably teach better than many teachers if used correctly.

VHB
Member
VHB
year	sell	list	sell/list
2001	1225	3395	36.1%
2002	2248	3626	62.0%
2003	1966	3810	51.6%
2004	1954	3039	64.3%
2005	1697	3360	50.5%
2006	1924	3471	55.4%
2007	1806	4067	44.4%
2008	1819	4675	38.9%
2009	762	3700	20.6%
2010	1923	5147	37.4%
2011	1819	4801	37.9%
2012	1577	5756	27.4%
Mean	1727	4071	42.4%
median	1819	3755	47.5%

Anyone think we’re going to beat the 5756 new listings from January 2012 this month? That’s a lot of listings.

No point in posting the month-end projections until we get a few days deeper into the month–7 day moving average includes weird end of December stuff right now.

Just Looking
Guest

@ Name Taken

“This discussion is not on topic for a RE blog” and then you go on with the same discussion :)”

True enough – have a good evening!

painted turtle
Guest
painted turtle

Muir was interviewed on the same construction site, with the same grey sky, two weeks ago. So I believe it is an extract from a former interview. By the way, that former interview was also strange: the grass was green around Muir while the rest of the images showed Vancouver covered in snow. Which makes me think that these two Muir’s interviews are both old news, re-cooked. May be Global does not even bother interviewing Muir over and over, since he is always saying the same thing…

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
‘This means that while it is relatively much cheaper to build (and buy) a TV in 2010 than in 1970, it is relatively much more expensive to run a school (it still requires a teacher in front of about 30 kids for a whole year – pretty much the same as 1970, but with the added cost of technology in schools that needs to be updated every 4 years).’ The reason we have not seen efficiencies in things like traditional education (grade 1 to 12 / university) is because government controls it. Even with technology there is little change in how our education system works. If governments were in charge of manufacturing we would still have workers soldering the electronics by hand and would not see better TVs at cheaper prices. The soviet union is a perfect example of how… Read more »
southseacompany
Member
southseacompany

News Hour – Will the real estate market take a tumble?
Wed, Jan 2 – With the cooling of assessed property values comes the inevitable question: is the real estate market about to take a serious tumble? Jas Johal reports.

http://www.globaltvbc.com/video/will+the+real+estate+market+take+a+tumble/video.html?v=2322743394&p=2&s=dd#video

Repeat of Cam Muir’s drawling, lazy voiced sound bite from last week saying the tightening of mortgage limits was unnecessary. Obviously Global is repeating it in case folks were dozing from too much turkey and missed it.

Name taken
Guest
Name taken

Just Looking, you say “This discussion is not on topic for a RE blog” and then you go on with the same discussion 🙂

Read the original post that is being discussed- it talks about increases in EI/CPP, health care premiums, taxes- if it is off topic for this blog then blame whoever posted it. I believe that your comments were on topic.

Anyway, I am signing off, have a good night.

P.S. final thought: following the logic of “LDB generates revenue for the government” the government must monopolize all other industries so that they too generate revenues for the government.

southseacompany
Member
southseacompany

Noon News Hour – Property values dropping
Wed, Jan 2: For the first time in many years, a “significant number” of properties in Vancouver’s Sea to Sky region are decreasing in value.

http://www.globaltvbc.com/video/property+values+dropping/video.html?v=2322693894&p=2&s=dd#video

b5baxter
Member
Jacob
Guest
Jacob

@Name taken
“Jacob, you are confused about this. First of all the companies you listed aren’t really from the countries that you mentioned-“

Confused? You maybe,.All mentioned companies are from “high taxed”, “socialist”, “evil government” of Europe.

Huawei? Gimme a break.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Is this still a housing blog?

Just Looking
Guest
@Name Taken This discussion is not on topic for a RE blog and as you haven’t provided any real informative contribution to this discussion, just opinion that is often unsupported by any evidence, so I’ll end my part in it with this: “Do your own research” – I did. I shared it. It led me to a different conclusion than the one you have made. I invited you to present a counter argument based in fact. You dismissed the data I shared and provided no data of your own except the case of wages at liquor stores, which doesn’t have any relevance to the argument that ‘taxes will always go up because governments aren’t spending their own money and are therefore wasteful’ as the LDB generates revenue for the government. I’d also point out that most employees and execs in… Read more »
Name taken
Guest
Name taken
Jacob, you are confused about this. First of all the companies you listed aren’t really from the countries that you mentioned- Siemens for example has more prominent historical ties to nazis and slave labor in striped uniforms than to the countries you mentioned. Second, companies like Ericsson aren’t doing that well. I used to own Ericsson phones back in 1996 when I lived in Scandinavia but today I would not know where to buy an Ericsson phone even if I wanted to. Third, and most importantly, 100 years ago those taxes were not anywhere close to what they are today in those countries. Here is the more appropriate question: do you think Ericsson will survive another 100 years? I don’t. Huawei will eat them up, and much much sooner than in 100 years. Finally, when companies like Ericsson lose their… Read more »
stagnate
Guest
stagnate

name taken: “you haven’t actually provided any evidence that government is a less efficient way to provide health care, education, etc. or that taxes are on an endless upwards spiral.”

although i agree the public unions could do with a haircut it was the campbell liberals that are to blame for the current senario. income tax rates were reduced drastically. the political payoff for that was relatively short term. now you see the flip side, the government scrambling to generate revenue on the fringes. ideology issues, will be interesting to see to what extent the ndp tries to reverse. the loss of hst revenue will hit also.

Jacob
Guest
Jacob

@Name taken
“Do you have any idea what it is like to actually do business in those countries and pay those taxes in case you are successful at it?”

well somehow that taxes did not hurt for 100 of years to worldwide leaders like BASF’s, Siemiens, Areva, TGV, BMW, WV, Ikea, Ericson, Roche, Rolex etc etc etc; you name it.
so what is your point?

Yalie
Guest
Yalie

given the choice I’d prefer the French or German model to either the US or Canadian system.

Amen. The worst thing about the so-called “debate” on healthcare in Canada is that it’s pitched as a binary alternative – Canadian public model vs. American private model. As you rightly point out, the data show that the hybrid systems (ie where consumers can choose either private or public) result in better outcomes and lower costs.

Name taken
Guest
Name taken

Jacob, what is your point? That socialist governments prevalent in Western Europe take better care of people who don’t want to work than the government of USA does? You are probably right. So what?

Do you have any idea what it is like to actually do business in those countries and pay those taxes in case you are successful at it? How is it not obvious what the end result will be for countries that stimulate laziness and discourage entrepreneurship?

Devore
Member
Devore
“Oh right, they’re going to start charging more for alcohol because the private system can’t do it as we’ll as the public one without raising costs to the end user.” Well, at least you didn’t call it an example of “unbridled capitalism”. Public monopoly to private monopoly is not the way to privatize. This is rife with corruption, nepotism and corporate welfare. I don’t really buy this “private industry always does it better” mantra, but you’re really throwing a strawman in here. There _should_ be some savings in most industries in private vs public, primarily on the basis of there being competition in the private space; everything government touches always becomes a legally mandated monopoly (or effectively one, like with mortgage insurance). Personally, I never understood why we are still buying liquor from a government warehouse, decades after prohibition. What… Read more »