A building with a twist

Vancouver is one step closer to getting an interesting new building, and that means it’s time to complain!

For a pretty laid-back town Vancouverites can get vocal about architecture when it departs from the average glass rectangle.

Even the color of the glass can upset some, remember when the city made the Wall Centre change their glass halfway through? Perhaps under the assumption that clear glass would make the building more transparent than black glass?

Well this new building is a weird shape, so get ready for the complaints.

The proposed 52 storey tower will be located downtown at the foot of the Granville Street bridge near Pacific and has a unique twist to it’s design, with a triangular base and a rectangular top.

Close to 800 people attended the two open houses on the project and about 25 spoke at a packed public hearing last night.

Opponents said the tower will block views of the water, cast shadows and bring too much density to the neighbourhood.

But local resident Dean Mailey says it will bring much-needed amenities and charm to the neighbourhood.

“Currently the site is an eyesore in our community. It’s not a nice place to look at any time of day or night.”

Read the original article over at the CBC.

 

 

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ILoveCharts
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ILoveCharts

If we’re going to pay such high prices for real estate, we might as well be getting buildings that are a little more awesome.

This building is great.

I just hope they install central air so that you don’t need to keep your windows open. A lot of those units will have a lot of traffic noise I think.

As for the “neighborhood” concerns, I think the closest thing to this building will be the pretty strippers at the Cecil. Let’s give it a break people. (To be clear, I have no issues with the ladies of the Cecil – they are wonderful.)

As for the building blocking views of the water and casting shadows. Unless you pay for true waterfront, that is going to happen to you sooner or later. Suck it up.

No Noise
Guest
No Noise

I just hope a bunch of suckers dont (do) pay too much – shouldn’t this tower be called “The Cecil” in honour of the previous establishment of course. Of course..

registered
Member
registered

Cementing again the surreal Mississauga vibe in that part of town: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absolute_World

Many Franks
Member
In the Globe, a particularly sunny piece about the outlook. Don’t count Bank of Canada out of the rate-hike game just yet: An upturn in global growth is virtually the only cure for Canada’s current domestic malaise, since fiscal stimulus has been replaced by government belt-tightening, and ultra-low rates are no longer having much stimulative impact. Really, no stimulative impact? Household debt levels also continue to improve thanks to ultra-low borrowing rates and principal reduction. Consumer financial payments (everything from mortgages or rent to credit card payments) are at a 30-year low of 15.7 per cent of personal disposable income. This is down from a peak of almost 19 per cent in 2007, and that is delivering a powerful boost to discretionary consumer spending: Every one percentage point decline in the financial obligations ratio adds $110-billion to consumer spending growth… Read more »
Newcomer
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Newcomer
Turkey
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Turkey

@Many Franks,

While we’re looking at public sentiment (and policy) having possibly overshot the mark:

Don’t rule out a surprise December ‘taper’ by the Fed. Here’s the final sentence:

The Wall Street majority might not agree, but a December “taper” remains a distinct possibility.

Back to Canada: Genworth stock rides resilience of Canadian housing market

When fears of bursting bubbles consumed markets mid-2012, investors punished the mortgage insurer. But as the real estate market demonstrated its resiliency, the huge discount imposed on Genworth’s stock has vanished.

It’s been a torrid streak for those who took a stake in the depressed equity. Now at an all-time high, the stock appears set to level off.

Those with both stones and experience might be salivating at the contrarian opportunity.

jesse
Member

Putting aside my natural cynicism and depressed outbursts, it’s nice to see something a little bit different.

But… this is a unique design. That uniqueness costs money. That uniqueness is almost purely consumptive, providing nothing more than cachet for the owner. The same internal amenities and quality can be achieved using a conventional cheaper construction plan. Not a problem in my mind, but there you go. Just saying.

SamanthaB
Guest
SamanthaB

vancouver is a world class city. it’s metropolitan nature is known globally amongst the elites. but our very own under classes can’t comprehend the global urban renisance we are experiencing.

i blame our education system for creating such derelict minds.

taylor192
Member

@#4 Many Franks

You do realize the G&M article is about US, NOT Canadian, households… right?

Teddybear
Member
Teddybear

@samanthaB
Your spelling – “renisance” – is a true example of what is wrong with education system.

(fyi, I am not a native English speaker, and I feel sorry for you)

I just got back from South Beach Miami, and I am in a true awe… well, THAT is a world class city!

Many Franks
Member

@taylor192: Ah, I missed that — makes much more sense. (As for American debt numbers, there’s an interesting chart circulating that differentiates student debt from all other types, suggesting looming problems there in the face of improvements in other debt categories.)

Many Franks
Member
Here comes the big F. Flaherty says wary of home price rises, will speak to market players: Finance Minister Jim Flaherty says he intends to get more directly involved with players in the housing sector to ensure the market doesn’t over heat. With the Bank of Canada signalling it won’t move on interest rates possibly until sometime in 2015, Flaherty says the responsibility of keeping the market stable falls on his department. The central bank’s position comes amid signs home sales and prices are regaining momentum after cooling last year when Flaherty clamped down on mortgage rules. Flaherty says he speaks regularly with market players, but is going to do more of it now to ensure the recent pick-up in sales and prices is a temporary phenomenon, and not the early signs of a housing bubble. He says at the… Read more »
Investing 101
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Investing 101

It looks like the S and P 500 will record the biggest annual gain in a decade. Hey Bull!Bull!Bull! how can you look your wife in the eye and tell her you missed it?

patriotz
Member
Active Member

@11:

Flaherty says he speaks regularly with market players, but is going to do more of it now to ensure the recent pick-up in sales and prices is a temporary phenomenon, and not the early signs of a housing bubble.

Oh, it’s temporary all right, and it’s not the early signs of a housing bubble.

It’s the last stage of a housing bubble.

intestinal twist colonoscopy
Guest
intestinal twist colonoscopy

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-24/oil-s-5-trillion-permian-boom-threatened-by-70-crude.html

“risks are mounting of a bust as analysts including Marshall Adkins of Raymond James & Associates Inc. forecast crude is heading down to $70 a barrel next year”

tedeastside
Member
tedeastside

99% of Americans have never heard of Vancouver BC, most world elites congregate in New York and Los Angeles…only third world people like Vancouver,, you’ll never see an American or European immigrating to Vancouver

Bull! Bull! Bull!
Guest
Bull! Bull! Bull!

@patriotz

“It’s the last stage of a housing bubble.”

patriotz, you seem to have a deep and well developed understanding of where we are in the bubble. please tell us when it’s going to pop.

Son of Ponzi
Guest
Son of Ponzi

Check out the latest report by A. Shuchart on Richmond’s RE.
Sellers continue to drop their asking prices, particularily on SFH.
There have been rumors that the people with the Gilligan Island hats are abandoning Richmond and moving to higher grounds.
http://www.shuchatgroup.com/blog.mobi/richmond-real-estate-market-report-9

ILoveCharts
Guest
ILoveCharts
tedeastside: I don’t know what part of Vancouver you hang out in but perhaps it is the Downtown East Side? Did you happen to catch the Vancouver Olympics? Basically everyone in the developed nation knows about Vancouver as a result of that little event. Do yourself a favour and get out and do some networking. http://www.boardoftrade.com/ is a good place to start. You will find lots of people in our local economy that make a good salary and you will also find that many of those people have immigrated here from America or Europe. Our sky high real estate prices are not justified. It’s clear that prices have been driven up by cheap credit, lax mortgage rules and an expectation that prices will continue to rise. (For what it’s worth, we would need a very large crash to burn over… Read more »
Snake
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Snake
venetian
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venetian

@ILoveCharts
hey thanks for that study about salaries from the previous thread. it is good.
My only problem with salaries in general not just Vancouver is that there is huge gap between middle level employees versus high end employees. That gap is even bigger with low skilled employees. An majority of employees are in that lower bracket. For every lawyer or engineer there are 1000 retail staff or baristas or admin staff etc etc
That is the problem. If you are not in the top 10-15% you struggle particularly in the city like Vancouver.

sunny day in vancouver
Guest
sunny day in vancouver

“If you are not in the top 10-15% you struggle particularly in the city like Vancouver.”
base on what you said, 85-90% of the people here in vancouver struggle? what were you smoking? whatever it was, must have been a bad batch.

space889
Member
space889

Looking through all the negative comments about the building design on the linked website, just curious what would Vancouverite consider to be a beautiful building? All the negative comments are always just that negative, yet never offer an example of what would be considered beautiful to have.

Oh yeah…as for everyone complaining about Vancouver going down the tubes due to densification, etc…maybe they should lobby city hall to stop new people from settling in Vancouver without a permit, which will only be issued when an existing resident or 2 leaves or dies? That way, population of Vancouver might slowly decrease and those complainers will have their beloved SFH neighborhood back again without all the high density eyesores??

venetian
Guest
venetian

sunny day in vancouver
“base on what you said, 85-90% of the people here in vancouver struggle?”

based on biblical household debt particularly in Vancouver. How did you miss that info?

Many Franks
Member
I’ll out myself as a reluctant optimist. Vancouver is a city with a lot of potential to be the best city in the world at being Vancouver. It’s always going to have small-man syndrome, culturally and economically. It’s in for a decade of trouble, in my opinion, as consumer debt problems unwind — but that’s just another example of BC’s blind enthusiasm for boom-then-bust cycles. We’ve been through enough of those but never seem to learn. Once the city gets knocked off its high horse — who knows how soon that’ll happen — it’ll be a better place for it. Meanwhile, that still leaves lots to enjoy, especially if you’re debt-free. I haven’t read the densification plan e.g. for Commercial Drive, but a few friends who have looked at it say it’s actually not a bad plan. It’s not like… Read more »
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