Map of assessment changes from 2013 to 2014

VMD pointed out this interesting zoomable map of assessed property value changes over the last year in Vancouver.

Anthony Smith at HealthyCityMaps created this map using BC assessment data.

At his site you can click and zoom in to see whats happened to values in different neighbourhoods.

Interesting to see how tax assessments vary from micro area to micro area.

Dark purple represents a large increase, yellow is neutral and dark orange is a large decrease from 2013 to 2014.

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 10.42.02 AM

View the full map here.

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hydravid video marketing software
Guest
hydravid video marketing software

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gordholio
Member
#13 bestplaceonearth, you said: “and you said the same thing when you cashed out in 2007. cant afford to buy back in since, can you!” First of all, could you maybe *try* to learn something about punctuation, sentence structure, and upper case? Not asking you to be an English major, but this Grade 3-level stuff doesn’t exactly add to your argument. Secondly, we sold in December 2010, not 2007. There were a half-dozen SFHs on the market in my neighbourhood at the time. Today there are three or four dozen or more. And prices have not risen. We would not get any more for our house had we held off ’til today. Indeed, we’d probably see less for the simple reason there are so many other houses available. So if in your world this means we “can’t afford to get… Read more »
kabloona
Member
kabloona

mac, that’s my impression….. he’s always reporting an imminent crash of some sort. Crying wolf too many times….

😉

mac
Member
mac

Kabloona

Oh. I didn’t know. Is he a perma-doomer? I’ll have to google him.

Son of Ponzi
Guest
Son of Ponzi

#40
1/3 gamble on the lottery.
The rest gamble on Real Estate.
In the coming years, the Lottery will be a better bet.

Melba
Guest
Melba

…..“A new poll out today, commissioned by BMO, found that a third of Canadians — an average of 34% of those polled across the country — say they are planning to fund their retirement by winning the lottery…..

Fools! All they have to do is drop their old car off with Cam Good and they’ll be set for life – just like the lottery, only they’re guaranteed to win! :O=

space889
Member
space889

@patriotz – really?? Care to share some math to back that up?

squeako
Guest
squeako
” I will now go and try to recover from the fact that my sibling has bought a house . . . . of course with boomer parent money. . .” Siblings do silly things all the time, but as you get older and keep growing up, one learns to do selective disengaging if they are not willing to take advise or at least listen. Continue to be connected as a family, but disengage in some areas. Should they complain one day, be very careful with what you say, you could focus on the positive, ie: “how great the view is, you own this” or just ask (very carefully) what the plan is and say that is great! The bottom line is that eventually we all will have to stand on our own two legs, including siblings. One problem with… Read more »
tedeastside
Member
tedeastside

it is hilarious that a crappy ice cold place like Vancouver is more expensive than great places with warm weather and job opportunity like California and Florida….any proud vancouverites wanna defend their city

Bull! Bull! Bull!
Guest
Bull! Bull! Bull!

remember when people thought that a lack luster CNY would result in a crash?

patriotz
Member

@26: “But there could finally by a light at the end of the tunnel: the rate at which they’re taking on debt is slowing, according to a report from Royal Bank of Canada.”

Since simply maintaining nominal RE prices at their current level requires increasing average household debt, this is bad news for the RE market.

kabloona
Member
kabloona

I think Ambrose Evans-Pritchard is a kook, that’s what….

😉

jessiotz
Guest
jessiotz

BLASPHEMER! every bubble is followed by a crash! how dare you contradict bear-dogma!

buyers will BURN IN HELL for their transgressions!

yvr2zrh Says:
which will not result in a sudden crash but a long-term reversion to the mean. Prices will stay flat or go down slowly

mac
Member
mac
yvr2zrh
Member
Well – – Some thoughts as we go into the weekend. After watching the market for about 5 years now – we have seen what moves the market up and down. Immigration, wages, interest rates, new housing starts, availability of cheap credit. Many of these will stay in a constant pattern for the next year. We have seen that condo owners in the past 5 years are basically flat on their condo – sucks to be them – especially if they had planned on using it to flip into a house down payment. No matter how you slice it – – the cost of owning is very very high – and if you want to be an owner (which so many people seem to want to be), you will have to pay more to own than rent (in almost all… Read more »
UBC in crisis mode
Guest
UBC in crisis mode

Can someone find out how much this property is sold for?
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:kPVf4FeqzNMJ:www.realestatesrichmond.com/property_details-V1036570.html+&cd=4&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca&client=firefox-a

2988 SASAMAT ST, Vancouver, BC, V6R 4R6
MLS® no V1036570 Subarea: Point Grey
Asking: $2,428,000

bestplaceonearth
Guest
bestplaceonearth

#13,
and you said the same thing when you cashed out in 2007. cant afford to buy back in since, can you!

space889
Member
space889

As long as your rate of borrowing and the interest rate is less than rate of increase in your disposable income, you can continue to borrow for a long time. On a societial level, as long as the average interest rate track the growth in nominal GDP and net borrowing rate is less than growth rate in nominal GDP, the borrowing can go on for a long time, perhaps even infinitely. It is only a trouble when borrowing rate exceeds GDP growth continuously.

Also for lottery, remember it is not luck, it is based on skills on picking the winning number and everyone has a secret brilliant system that simply is waiting for its time to come 🙂

VMD
Member

@patriotz 24
The real RE lottery winners are the ones who bought long ago, sold, and don’t spending all the winnings (and then some) buying even more lottery tickets at much inflated prices : )

Many Franks
Member
Active Member

Once again we’re being given the “debt is under control” line.

Rate of Canadian Debt Accumulation Slowed Last Year

Canadians are more in hock than they’ve ever been, and they’re continuing to borrow more all the time.

But there could finally by a light at the end of the tunnel: the rate at which they’re taking on debt is slowing, according to a report from Royal Bank of Canada.

Personal debt rose by 3.9% in the 12 months ended in December, the report said. That marked the slowest annual growth since 1995. And it compared to 4.0% year-over-year growth in November, and 5.1% last December.

3.9% is still above inflation, and its moderation still doesn’t address the absolute levels of debt. Sorry, RBC, not buying it.

YVR
Guest
YVR

@22

We can criticize people all we want for many poor financial decisions but I know many people who are in this boat who will never have enough money for retirement unless they win the lottery and it is absolutely no fault of their own–they are squeezed by low wages/high taxes and user fees/high cost of living.

Actually because of our social system in Canada (you know the one that requires working people to pay taxes/user fees) everyone has enough money for retirement. Many people retire with no money at all living off 100% government support. Saving for retirement is just a question of the standard of living you will have. Of course if you only have government support the standard of living won’t be very good.

patriotz
Member

@22: ” Also, baby boomers who bought real estate 20 to 30 years ago have already won the lottery–they’ve won the real estate lottery. ”

Nope, they just think they’ve won. The only ones who’ve actually won are those who’ve sold.

Unlike 6/49 etc, the winnings depend on when you cash in your ticket.

xyz
Guest
xyz

More stories from the Landlord Twilight Zone.
The guy who drops 1.3 Million on the best house on the worst street.
Now assessed at $1,207,000…
New ad up for his illegal 2 bedroom basement suite just noticed today. $1250/m + 30% of utilities where rents in the area are dropping like flies. For instance, I just rented a 3 bedroom upper closer to Vancouver for $1200. My ex is viewing a 2 bedroom basement suite tomorrow $650/m.

A little googling and it looks like this is the second time in 7 months he has advertised… The new tenant will be at least the 3rd since the guy took possession July 2012 slight problem with turnover looks like.. 🙂

George
Guest
George
@kabloona #21 Regarding people who are planning on funding their retirement via lottery winnings: I think “planning” is the wrong verb here. It’s not that people are “planning” on winning the lottery in order to have enough money for retirement. It’s that people are being realistic and honest with themselves and saying, gosh, given the cost of living and my low wages the only way I will ever have enough money for my retirement is if I win the lottery. We can criticize people all we want for many poor financial decisions but I know many people who are in this boat who will never have enough money for retirement unless they win the lottery and it is absolutely no fault of their own–they are squeezed by low wages/high taxes and user fees/high cost of living. Also, baby boomers who… Read more »
kabloona
Member
kabloona
Canadian Business: 34% of Canadians plan to retire by winning the lottery – Stretches the definition of “plan” http://www.canadianbusiness.com/blogs-and-comment/retirement-lottery/ 🙂 BTW, guess which province has the highest proportion of Lottery Dreamers…?? Yeah….. 😉 “A new poll out today, commissioned by BMO, found that a third of Canadians — an average of 34% of those polled across the country — say they are planning to fund their retirement by winning the lottery. To be clear: that is an absolutely insane plan. Although Chris Buttigieg, the Senior Manager of Wealth Planning Strategy for the bank quoted in the press release, is too polite to say so outright: “To those hoping to win the lottery to fund their retirement, the odds of actually winning are approximately 1 in 14 million. A much better bet would be to develop a personal retirement savings and… Read more »