All posts by VCI Admin

Axing the property transfer tax

The Premier would like to get rid of or minimize the property transfer tax but it currently just brings in too much money.

“We really want to start knocking down the property transfer tax because it is a drag on our economy. It is one thing that we can do to try and increase affordability,” Clark said.

“Why don’t we do it in this budget? Because this year we brought in $928 million in revenue. The only way to replace that would be to raise taxes elsewhere,” she said.

Is the buying and selling of homes where our economy needs a boost?

Read the full article here.

Eliminate character to avoid affordability 

There are some old homes on Vancouver and some people think we shouldn’t be tearing down 1000 of them each year.  The city has some heritage and ‘character’ protections in place, but these have the unfortunate side effects of slowing the relentless rising of house prices:

“The real data on the house next door is that it reduced the value by 15 per cent,” said Jackson, whose neighbour’s house was re-listed and sold for less money after the city determined it has “character features” on the exterior. 

Read the full article here

Friday Free-for-all! February 17th 2017

It’s the end of another work week and that means it’s time for another Friday Free-for-all! 

This is our regular end of the week news round up and open topic discussion thread for the weekend. A few recent links to kick off the chat:

widespread mortgage fraud?

housing affordability flaw

bc ferry single bid

help to buy drives up entry prices

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes in the comments below and have an excellent weekend! 

In Vancouver your basement suite can be a mansion

Someone at zero hedge saw the unoccupied units stats for Vancouver and decided to refer to them all as ‘mansions’:

There Are 66,719 Empty Mansions In Vancouver

Yan said most of these were concentrated in three areas: Coal Harbour, Marine Gateway and Joyce-Collingwood. Surrey came in second at 11,195, Burnaby at 5,829 and Richmond at 4,021. The focus has clearly been on the most expensive neighborhoods: the number of unoccupied units increased 25% in Richmond between the 2011 and 2016 census and by 28 per cent in Burnaby.

To take advantage of this multi-million mansion ghost town, in November 2016 the Vancouver city council voted to approve a tax on empty homes, the first in Canada. Based on self-reporting owners, the tax is a one-per-cent charge on homes that are not principal residences or are not rented out for at least six months of the year. The goal was to improve Vancouver’s tight rental vacancy rate of 0.6 per cent by encouraging owners of thousands of empty units to offer them up for renting.

Read the full article here.