Category Archives: data

Mortgage rules are working to cool market

Pointed out by SouthSeaCompany: Mortgage rule changes are cooling housing market: Morneau

“Finance Minister Bill Morneau says last October’s sweeping mortgage rule changes aimed at cooling Canada’s housing market have successfully dampened high-risk borrowing.”

“But despite a report urging Ottawa to look at ways of boosting support for Canadians entering the housing market, the Minister ruled out any new measures along those lines, expressing concern that such an approach would encourage higher house prices.”

Read the full article over at the Globe and Mail.

New mortgage rules hit Genworth hard

New mortgage insurance rules are having an impact over at Genworth:

Genworth MI Canada Inc., which provides mortgage insurance for home buyers and financial institutions, said the total value of new insurance it wrote in the second quarter of 2017 was down 81 per cent to $6.1-billion from $31.7-billion in the same period last year.

Most of the decline was the result of a 96-per-cent drop in the value of portfolio insurance written in the quarter, which is bulk insurance bought by financial institutions for their portfolios of uninsured mortgages. New portfolio insurance fell to $1.1-billion from $25.9-billion in the second quarter last year.

Read the full article here.

CMHC keeps crying ‘Wolf’

The Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation keeps on giving the national real estate market it’s worst possible rating. You can probably guess which cities get singled out as the most at risk:

CMHC’s valuation is part of its quarterly Housing Market Assessment, something the Crown corporation calls an early warning system, alerting Canadians to areas of concern developing in housing markets so that they may take action in a way that promotes market stability.

In terms of the 15 individual markets studied, CMHC said it saw strong evidence of overall problematic conditions in Victoria, Vancouver, Saskatoon, Hamilton and Toronto – the same five markets singled out a quarter ago.

CMHC defines problematic conditions as imbalances in the housing market that occur when overbuilding, overvaluation, overheating and price acceleration, or combinations of those issues exceed historical norms.

Read the full article here.

Sales slow, but what about prices?

An article over at the province says that real estate sales in Vancouver and Toronto have slowed, but don’t expect prices to follow:

“We’ll still have very lofty prices in Toronto and Vancouver. If we’re expecting the market to become instantly affordable that’s not going to happen. Given the low interest rates and rapid population inflow, they will still be expensive markets but we’re moving away, thankfully, from the days where there was incredible pressure for buyers to get in before prices grew another 40 per cent,” Bank of Montreal senior economist Douglas Porter said.

read the full article here.

OMG OSFI!

YVR pointed out this article by Rob Mclister about the OSFI B-20 bombshell:

The new OSFI’s stress test rules will make 20% of the mortgage market not qualify or they will have to reduce their mortgage by 18% to qualify. That is before recent and future mortgage rate increases are factored in.

Roughly 80% of new big bank lending in the richly valued Toronto and Vancouver markets is low-ratio mortgage lending

OSFI’s stress test, as proposed, would slash buying power for prime buyers by roughly 18%

For non-prime borrowers, qualifying rates would immediately rocket into the 6% to 7% range

Read the full article here.