Category Archives: data

Runaway market taking ‘a breather’

As you may be aware it is always a good time to buy or sell real estate according to most real estate professionals who earn their living by buying and selling real estate.

Well right now it’s a great time to buy or sell real estate because the runaway market is taking a breather.

It’s a “soft landing,” according to Royal LePage CEO Phil Soper, who says their latest house price survey shows the effects of government measures to cool things down.

What were previously called the “dangerously overheated” conditions in Metro Vancouver housing have cooled significantly, but prices have remained resilient.

He says it’s the soft landing policy-makers had hoped for, rather than a crash.

“But it won’t stay this way for long. Household formation in Canada… is going to grow rapidly,” he predicts.

Read the full article here.

Home sales continue to slide

Home sales in BC continue their decline.

“Sales fell 33.2 per cent compared to the same month a year ago, and the average residential price of $685,749 was down 1.1 per cent from September of 2017.”

“Association chief economist Cameron Muir says, “The impact on affordability and purchasing power caused by the mortgage stress test and moderately higher interest rates are negating the effect of the extraordinarily strong performance of B.C.’s economy over the last five years.”

Read the full article here.

Hey Vancouver! Why so miserable?

You’d think that living in a great city would make you happy, but apparently that’s not true for everyone.  Southseacompany points out this article about why people in Vancouver and Toronto are so unhappy.

Vancouver is now a place you try to survive as much as enjoy. All the problems are well known, the greatest being the high cost of housing. When you, as a young person, have little hope of making a comfortable life in a city that you love, of course it’s going to cause unhappiness. There is a sense that Vancouver is being yanked away from those who love it most, taken over by mercantilists and arrivistes from around the world who care little about a city’s “soul” so long as the skiing’s good and there’s a place that sells beluga caviar. And then there are those sitting on a lottery ticket with the house they bought years ago, waiting to cash out, and those sitting on a mountain of debt, praying interest rates don’t go up. It doesn’t sound like the kind of environment that would engender a cool community vibe, a place where relationships between people can flourish. And that, I think, is what the survey on happiness has tapped into.

Read the full article here.