Category Archives: data

the $200 margin of error

This is hard to believe, but apparently more than half of all Canadians are just $200 away from not being able to pay their bills.

“With such a small amount of wiggle room, any kind of unanticipated hardship, such as a job loss or even a car repair, could send an already struggling family into financial despair,” said Grant Bazian, president of MNP’s personal insolvency practice, which is one of the largest in Canada.

For 10 per cent of Canadians, the margin of error when it comes to household finances is even thinner, at $100 or less.

But those with anything at all left at the end of the month were in better shape than many: A whopping 31 per cent of respondents said they already don’t make enough to meet all their financial obligations.

Then there’s this little detail:

Another hair-raising finding from the survey: Roughly 60 per cent said they don’t have a firm grasp of how interest rates affect debt repayments.

The statistic helps explain why many indebted Canadians end up taking on more debt and high-cost loans, said Bazian. “That’s how so many end up in an endless cycle of debt,” he noted.

Shouldn’t be a problem, interest rates are low forever now aren’t they?

Read the full article over at Global News.

We’re all super-high on housing

From southseacompany, confidence in the Canadian housing market has reached a record high:

“The experts are getting louder in their warnings that a housing bubble has formed in some parts of Canada, but Canadians don’t seem worried.”

“In fact, confidence in the housing market hit a record high in the latest weekly Bloomberg-Nanos index — even as respondents turned negative on their own personal finances.”

“The survey found 48.5 per cent of Canadians expect house prices to rise in the next six months, the highest level recorded in the survey since 2008. Fewer than 11 per cent expect to see house prices decrease.”

Read the full article over at Huffington Post.

Friday Free-for-all! April 21, 2017

It’s the end of another glorious work-week in the ‘couve and that means it’s time for another fabulous Friday free-for-all!

This is our standard run-on-the-mill end of the week news round up and open topic discussion thread for the weekend, here are a few links to kick off the chat:

Richmond Air BnB RIP
Vancouver sees first price increase in 8 months
Should first-timers rethink buying in a hot market?
Canada shadow banking half the size of banks
Ontario starts tracking residency for RE purchases
Define ‘foreign buyer denier’
Site C losses up to $1 billion?
Who would benefit from a crash?
44% like idea of 30% tax on foreign buyers

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes in the comments section below and have a superb weekend!

Have we seen this movie before? Canada surpasses US bubble peak

Even outside of ridiculous vancouver, this nation is real estate crazy. In many key metrics Canada has surpassed the US housing bubble at its peak.

As David Rosenberg, the chief economist at Gluskin Sheff told BNN Thursday, “This bubble is on par with what we had in the States back in ’05, ’06, ’07. We have to actually take a look at the situation. The housing market here is in a classic price bubble. If you don’t acknowledge that, you have your head in the sand.”

Read the full article over at Macleans.

Owe Canada! Canadians love debt

Owe Canada posted this in the weekends thread and it’s got some very interesting numbers:

Canadian annual gdp at the present time is $2.06 trillion.

In the 1 year period from the end of December, 2015 to the end of December, 2016 (calendar year 2016) the Canadian economy grew by 1.4% – ie: the size of the economy grew by $28.9 billion.

In this same 1 year time frame the total debt outstanding in Canada grew by $309 billion. For each $1.00 the economy grew in this 1 year period the total debt outstanding increased by $10.69.

Looking at just the total debt outstanding of domestic non-financial sectors in Canada. In the 1 year period from the end of December, 2015 to the end of December, 2016 the total debt outstanding of domestic non-financial sectors increased by $215 billion. For each $1.00 the economy grew in this 1 year period the total debt outstanding of domestic non-financial sectors increased by $7.43.

At the end of December, 2016 the total debt outstanding in Canada was 3.5 times greater than our annual gdp, and looking at just the total debt outstanding of domestic non-financial sectors, that was 2.5 times greater than our annual gdp.

Here’s more from Owe Canada.