Category Archives: hype

Bank of Canada warns of housing market vulnerability

The bank that cried wolf: Housing market vulnerabilities are still high.

Vulnerabilities in the Canadian housing market are still high despite rising interest rates and tighter mortgage rules, Bank of Canada Senior Deputy Governor Carolyn Wilkins said on Thursday.

It also released results of a model it said showed Canadian banks’ capital positions would not be affected by a 20 percent correction in the housing market, with the biggest declines in Toronto and Vancouver.

Read the full article here.

Runaway market taking ‘a breather’

As you may be aware it is always a good time to buy or sell real estate according to most real estate professionals who earn their living by buying and selling real estate.

Well right now it’s a great time to buy or sell real estate because the runaway market is taking a breather.

It’s a “soft landing,” according to Royal LePage CEO Phil Soper, who says their latest house price survey shows the effects of government measures to cool things down.

What were previously called the “dangerously overheated” conditions in Metro Vancouver housing have cooled significantly, but prices have remained resilient.

He says it’s the soft landing policy-makers had hoped for, rather than a crash.

“But it won’t stay this way for long. Household formation in Canada… is going to grow rapidly,” he predicts.

Read the full article here.

More imaginary buyers

For some reason even in a hot market some salespeople feel compelled to make up fake buyers. You might remember the fake sisters posing as buyers for a news story.

Well a North Van Realtor has been found guilty of professional misconduct after a competing offer was presented from a buyer who doesn’t exist.

According to the disciplinary panel’s written reasons, Inglis testified at the hearing that the offer from a buyer with a last name of “Huang” had been left on the kitchen counter on the property –along with a real estate agent’s business card – at an open house, after he’d given a pre-printed offer form to an “Asian person” who asked for it. He told the council he’d altered the form to delete his own name as the buyer’s agent, and added the real estate agent’s name whose card had been left with the offer.

But that real estate agent told the panel he hadn’t been involved in writing the offer and had not had a client named Huang.  The discipline committee also noted Inglis gave a contradictory version of how he’d received the offer in a message he left for his co-listing agent, saying he’d been handed the offer in person. A handwriting expert called to testify said it was “probable” Inglis wrote the offer himself.

The committee concluded Inglis had changed or made up the offer to create the impression that his story about receiving offers on the property was true, then made “false statements” to both his co-listing agent and the real estate council about it.

When Inglis found out about the investigation, he called the co-listing agent and left her a phone message, according to the panel’s written reasons, saying, “So if you really want to get blackballed you’ve gone to the right person because trust me I wield a bigger bat than you do.” The message continued: “So you’re off my books as far as ever doing a deal. I will never, ever, ever process one of your offers ever. So you’re done.”

Read the full article here.

Calgary most liveable city in Canada?

The economist ranks Calgary as the most liveable city in Canada, Vancouver follows up in 6th place.

Every year, the research and analysis arm of the London-based publisher of the Economist magazine ranks 140 cities and scores them based on 30 different factors, boiled down to five categories:

  • Stability (based on local rates of crime, terrorism and military unrest).
  • Quality of local health care.
  • Local culture and environment (everything from weather to quality of local restaurants).
  • Quality of education.
  • Quality of infrastructure (everything from transit to electrical grids and telecommunications networks).

Melbourne was first seven years in a row before being displaced by the Austrian capital.

Not factored in on that list: cost of living or incomes. Read the full article over at the CBC.