Category Archives: prices

We’re not number one.

Southseacompany shared this link to a list of global cities with the most overvalued real estate:

Swiss bank UBS’s Global Real Estate Bubble Index 2019 found a significant overvaluation in half of the 24 housing markets analysed by the research. The bubble risk appears greatest in seven global cities, with Munich the most vulnerable, followed by Toronto, Hong Kong, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, Vancouver and Paris. Major imbalances are also found in locations such as London, San Francisco, Tokyo and Stockholm, while valuations are considered stretched in Los Angeles, Sydney and Geneva.

Read the full article here.

19% mortgage fraud rate?

Bullwhip29 shared this story claiming 1 in 5 millennials commit mortgage fraud:

Around one in five (19 per cent) of Millennial home buyers responding to the survey admitted to inflating their annual income on their mortgage application. And nearly 23 per cent of Millennial home buyers said they think this is an acceptable course of action in today’s mortgage climate — nearly double the 12 per cent of all respondents who agreed this was OK.

Read the full article here.

Sales rise in July but prices slide

We saw and increase in prices last month, but so far that isn’t showing an impact on prices which continue to fall.

That’s according to the latest data from the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), which said that despite the bump, sales remained 7.8 per cent below the 10-year July sales average.

“Despite the bump in sales, prices have continued to slide. The benchmark price for a detached home across the region in July was $1.4 million, down 10.5 per cent from July 2018 and down 0.5 per cent from June this year.

Read the full article here.

Next price uptick in 2021?

Central 1 credit union is forecasting further big drops in sales and a “marshmallow soft” market for the next few years.

The province’s median home resale price across the year is expected to decline 4.1 per cent in 2019, then a further 1.2 per cent in 2020. This will be followed by the most meagre of recoveries in 2021 with a 1 per cent rise, which doesn’t even bring the median back to 2019 prices.

The biggest short- to medium-term price declines are expected, unsurprisingly, in Metro Vancouver, said Yu – but this could be what puts the market back on track in the longer term.

“In Metro Vancouver, on a benchmark basis, prices are down around eight per cent and we’re expecting that to fall further, giving us a total peak-to-trough decline of about 12 to 15 per cent. So that will erase a lot of the gains we saw from 2016 onwards. But this should pull some people back into the market.

Read the full article here.