Category Archives: prices

NDP to review BC first time buyer loans program

The recent BC first time buyer loans program announced by the liberal government has successfully driven condo prices higher by handing out interest free loans from tax payers to first time buyers, but it sounds like David Eby and the NDP want to ruin that party:

“We were told by economists at SFU, UBC, CMHC that the impact of the program would be to increase the cost of the housing stock,” says Eby.

“Essentially a transfer of money directly to developers and people selling their existing homes, and put people further into debt. So if that is truly the impact of the program in Metro Vancouver, then that’s something we want to review and make sure there’s not a better way we could allocate the $700-million that’s been allocated to that program.”

Read the full article over at News 1130.

What does a Green / NDP government mean for house prices in Vancouver BC?

The Green Party and NDP have announced an intention to form the government of BC and they have some different approaches to the real estate economy than the BC Liberals.

So what does the future look like to you? Will the new government implement some of their more dramatic policy changes and what does this mean for the Vancouver Housing Bubble and the wider BC real estate economy?

Oracle had the following wish list:

1) 30% FBT Province wide. Absolutely No Loopholes.

2) Tax 2nd homes of Citizens an annual property surcharge of 2% with rental offset. 3rd and more homes tax surcharge of 5%.

3) Tax homes of non taxpaying non residents 2%. Tax 2nd homes at 5%.

4) Limit foreign student at any institution to 15% maximum to ease rental crisis.

5) Inteoduce rental tax credit to out tax Evading Landords.

6) Pressure Federal government to limit 10 year tourist visas stays to a max of 3 months per year.

7) introduce extended mortgage amortization periods for those owners who will go underwater with the above changes.

Markoz points out this shift might not be painless for anyone:

Horgan and Weaver Have a Tough Job Ahead.

If they do all the things Eby talked about, real estate prices will definitely come down. The problem is, Krispy has painted our economy into a corner where it is very RE dependent. Lower prices mean lost jobs in construction and related industries. Also, as others have pointed out, lower tax revenues. There are many benefits to lower prices but they may not be self-evident to the 70% who own. Especially people who bought in the last 3 years.

The Krispy alternative, letting prices run amok until a 1 bedroom condo is $4 m, is not an alternative. Still, doing the right thing is going to be very painful and politically unpopular with many.

Dave wonders what’s next for Christy:

I think Clark should make a throne speech and outline what she wants to do for the next year of government and see what happens. Let the Greens and NDP shoot her vision down but at least people know what got voted down. I also think she should also try to split the NDP and Greens, not because it’s politically smart, but because voters should know what their MLAs stand for and support. Small chance she can pull something off, but not likely. I don’t see any ridings or obvious MLAs that the Liberals could split or steal.

Let us know your thoughts on the future of the BC economy and real estate prices in the comments below!

Why does the foreign buyer tax only apply to Metro Vancouver?

Some people love the foreign buyer tax, some people hate it, but at least one person thinks it was a conflict of interest for the finance minister to enact it only in Metro Vancouver when he owns investment properties just outside that boundary:

 

The one home and six investment properties that belong to Mike de Jong in Abbotsford are worth almost $1 million – a significant investment that rose in value relative to similar properties inside Metro Vancouver, records suggest.

That puts de Jong in a conflict of interest when handling the province’s controversial real estate file, says Duff Conacher of Democracy Watch.

“Given that the finance minister has significant real estate investments, I don’t think he should have been taking part in this,” Conacher said.

“He would have to recuse himself or sell his properties. It has to be one or the other. He can’t have a private interest and take part in decisions about his properties.”

But de Jong tells CTV News he had nothing on his mind except doing his job when he moved and voted for the tax in the B.C. Legislature.

“The decision was based exclusively on the analysis of the data,” he said outside a Liberal caucus meeting.

Read the full article over at CTV news.

We’re all super-high on housing

From southseacompany, confidence in the Canadian housing market has reached a record high:

“The experts are getting louder in their warnings that a housing bubble has formed in some parts of Canada, but Canadians don’t seem worried.”

“In fact, confidence in the housing market hit a record high in the latest weekly Bloomberg-Nanos index — even as respondents turned negative on their own personal finances.”

“The survey found 48.5 per cent of Canadians expect house prices to rise in the next six months, the highest level recorded in the survey since 2008. Fewer than 11 per cent expect to see house prices decrease.”

Read the full article over at Huffington Post.