Category Archives: rates

28% of Canadians say rate hike would cause bankruptcy

From southseacompany: this survey claims that more than a quarter of Canadians think that another rate increase would push them into bankruptcy.

The poll comes just days before an anticipated interest rate hike by the Bank of Canada and was conducted on behalf of MNP, a leading Canadian bankruptcy firm, between June 15 and June 19. The same poll found that 42% of Canadians say that if interest rates rise much more their financial well-being will be put in jeopardy.

The Bank of Canada has raised interest rates three times since last summer, and investors expect the central bank will boost its target for the overnight rate to 1.5% this Wednesday (July 11).

Read the full article here.

Loonie leaps on hints of rate hike

From southseacompany an article about the lowly looney leaping up on hints of a Canadian interest rate hike:

The Canadian dollar shot up Wednesday after the Bank of Canada held the line on a key interest rate but pointed to a boost in the future.

In foreign exchange trading, the loonie was ahead by 0.82 of a cent at 77.64 cents US when stock markets closed on Wednesday, after being up by more than one cent earlier in the day.

The central bank left its key target for the overnight rate unchanged at 1.25 per cent, where it has been since mid-January.

However, the bank said in a statement accompanying its decision that developments since April reinforce its view that “higher interest rates will be warranted to keep inflation near target.”

Read the full article over at the CBC.

How sharp a correction?

Most economist are predicting a slower housing market in Canada, but how slow is too slow?

Southseacompany points to this article wondering how ‘sharp’ any correction would be:

Last week, the Bank of Canada hiked the overnight rate to 1.25 per cent, causing the credit union to note that Canadians have some of the highest levels of household debt in the world.

The interest rate hike — when combined with a new mortgage stress test for uninsured borrowers that came into effect on January 1 — could severely limit the purchasing power of many would-be home buyers, cooling the market dramatically.

But while most economists agree that these factors will dampen the market in the first few months of 2018, many believe it will eventually adjust to the changes. What’s more, some argue that Canadians debt levels aren’t as worrying as they might first appear.

“Household debt in Canada is seen by some as unsustainably high and a source of vulnerability for the financial system,” write National Bank chief economist Stéfane Marion and senior economist Matthieu Arseneau in a recent report. “But the international evidence suggests that Canadian household leverage and home prices are not abnormal.”

Read the full article here.

Mortgages getting more expensive

Southseacompany shared this article, looks like everyone’s mortgage is going to get more expensive:

The Bank of Canada raised its benchmark interest rate to 1.25 per cent Wednesday and signalled that, barring certain risks, more hikes are likely in the rest of the year. That’s creating an unusual situation for Canadians: for the first time in years, those renewing mortgages will be faced with higher rates and an increase in payments.

Even before Wednesday’s decision, five of the country’s largest banks hiked five-year fixed rates 15 basis points to 5.14 per cent last week. (CIBC is still offering 4.99 per cent.) In a country where consumers have grown accustomed to low rates, and where households are burdened with record levels of debt relative to income, this kind of change is worth noting. A recent survey published by insolvency trustee MNP Ltd.found 48 per cent of Canadian respondents were $200 or less away from being unable to fulfill their monthly financial obligations, an eight point increase since September.

Read the full article over at Macleans.

Interest rates shoot higher

Southseacompany pointed out this article about rising interest rates around the world:

The bond market is getting a wake-up call from global central banks that the post-financial crisis era of easy money and super low interest rates is coming to an end.

In what was a sizzling move for the Treasury market, the 10-year yield zipped higher Tuesday amid talk that the Bank of Japan could finally be ready to wind down its easy policies. The 10-year yield broke above the key 2.50 percent level and was trading as high as 2.55 percent, the highest since March.

The 10-year is key since it is a benchmark that mortgages and many other consumer and business loans are based on.

Read the full article here.