Saturday Free-for-all?!?

You know how it goes…

The Christmas music starts up, you start thinking of holidays and then you wake up 2 months later with a tremendous hangover and a huge credit card bill.

Welcome to the holiday season, lets kick this off as early as we can!

This week it’s going to be a Saturday free-for-all. Our regularly scheduled open topic discussion thread was delay.

Carry on!

Sellers must disclose residency for tax purposes

It has long been the case that buyers are responsible for withholding 25% of the purchase price for the CRA to determine if capitol gains are owing, but now there will be a checkbox for the seller to indicate their residency status:

The B.C. government will soon require sellers to disclose their residency during a real-estate transaction so that information can be shared with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

Observers say it’s a much-needed change that replaces an honour system that was open to abuse by speculators seeking to avoid paying capital-gains tax on properties they don’t live in. But some worry that because the province is placing the onus for confirming that information on the buyer, it exposes them to potential fines or even jail time if they get it wrong. A buyer who doesn’t properly certify a seller’s residency status could also be on the hook for unpaid capital-gains tax.

The government has changed a tax form used to collect the property-transfer tax to include whether the sellers in real estate transactions are Canadian residents under the Income Tax Act. Canadian resident homeowners do not pay tax on the increased value – or capital gains – of a property designated as a principal residence. Non-residents must pay capital-gains tax at the time of a sale.

Read the full article here

More supply in a bubble leads to a bigger crash

Southseacompany pointed out this article:

“The BC government has promised to tackle the housing affordability crisis in Metro Vancouver by “aggressively” increasing supply. A new study coming out of Princeton suggests that the NDP government may want to reconsider that strategy. In Economic Consequences of Housing Speculation, researchers link increased supply to a more severe crash when the bubble bursts”

“But Zhenyu Gao, Michael Sockin, Wei Xiong found that “housing speculation, anchored, in part, on extrapolation of past housing price changes, led not only to greater price increases and more housing construction during the boom in 2004 to 2006, but also to more severe economic downturns during the subsequent bust in 2007 to 2009.”

Read the full article here