Tag Archives: bank

Friday Free-for-all!

Welcome!

What time is it? It’s time for yet another Friday Free-for-all!

This is our regular end of the week news round up and open topic discussion thread for the weekend, here are a few recent links to kick off the chat:

BOC rate hike?
Boomers overexposed on RE
Condos finally hot again
Bad ending to housing surge
Hyper-mega-bull called it
middle class housing projects
Fintrac fine for Canadian bank

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes here and have an excellent weekend!

About that BOC / IMF conspiracy…

Now normally when you hear about a conspiracy lawsuit against the Bank of Canada, the International Monetary Fund and the Queen of England you would assume Lizard People are involved right?

But in this case the government has already exhausted all but one chance to have the case thrown out and their last chance expires in the next week.

Is it possible the tin foil hats might have something here? Certainly it helps that their lawyer has a history of winning unlikely cases.

So what’s it all about?  Here’s what the Epoch Times says:

Toronto-based COMER and its fellow plaintiffs Ann Emmett and William Krehm are suing over fundamental changes to the Bank of Canada’s role that were made in 1974 when the bank stopped making loans to the government.

The Bank of Canada (BoC) was founded in the Great Depression and played a major role loaning money to the government. It helped finance Canada’s war effort during World War II and could loan money to the government, without interest, if it chose to do so. Any profits the BoC made were returned to the government minus the Bank’s operating expenses. That last point remains the case today, with $1.7 billion sent to the Receiver General annually.

COMER alleges that by no longer providing these loans, the Bank and others named in the suit have forced the government to finance budget deficits by borrowing from private markets and paying hundreds of billions of dollars in interest. Last year, $28 billion—over 10 percent of the federal government’s $277 billion in expenditures—went to servicing the debt.

That’s more than what was spent on National Defence ($21.5 billion) and nearly as much as the Canada health transfer ($30.5 billion).

The Bank of Canada Act allows, or as COMER alleges—requires—the BoC to give the federal government loans up to a total value of one-third of the government’s predicted annual revenues. For provincial governments it is a quarter of those revenues. The loans have to be repaid within the first quarter of the next fiscal year. At that point, the government just needs to pay back the loan with incoming revenues, and take out another loan to make up any deficit.

So in essence, unless our translator has the lizard people language interpretation incorrect, this case is about the national debt and the Bank of Canada’s failure to loan money to the Government of Canada for free.

What do you think? Lizard People are coming to eat your children of something is going to change?

Read the full article here.

FFFA! Cancelations, Condos, Concern

Here we are at Friday again. That means it’s time for our regular end of the week news roundup and open topic discussion thread.

It’s Friday Free-for-all time!

Here are a few recent links to kick off the chat:

Judge kills Yaletown land swap
Labour participation drops
Oil crash bad for BC labourers
Condo cancelations in Toronto
Toronto and Montreal best cities?
Dodge warns on bank profits
Another retailer exits
Brain melting in panic

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes here and have an excellent weekend!

Subprime lending in Canada ‘rockets’ to record high

It’s a been a while since CMHC mortgage lending rules have been ramped back to more historical levels.

After dabbling in American style 40 year zero down mortgages we decided that might not be the best idea. Unfortunately we never did get the American style locked in interest rate for the full duration of the loan.

So now we’re back to 25 year terms and it’s more difficult to get a loan if you’re self employed.  A lot of loan applications that would have been approved a year or two ago are now being rejected.

So what affect has this had on the market so far?

Well apparently the sub-prime lending market in Canada has rocketed to a record level for one.

Capital Corp is a non-bank lender that has been operating since 1988. Their chief executive Eli Dadouch says there’s a lot of money out there for non-bank loans to higher risk borrowers.

He said there is no question it’s the top of the real estate cycle, so anybody lending out money has to be more careful today.

“People always want to deal with a bank, it’s the cheapest form of money,” he said. “When they come to us and people like us, it is because there is some type of story [behind why they can’t get credit]. It’s easy  to lend money, the talent in this business is getting it back.”

Read the full article in the Financial Post.

 

Does the Bank of Canada Think Real Estate Buyers are Suckers?

Some of you are under the impression that Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz does nothing but sit around all day eating Doritos and watching The West Wing on Netflix, but you are sadly mistaken.

He also issues reports that freak out Realtors.

Consumer debt loads and house prices that could be as much as 30 per cent overvalued are the two biggest risks to Canada’s economy, the Bank of Canada warned in its semi-annual Financial System Review on Wednesday.

Yeah, but “up to 30 percent” includes zero percent over-valued too you know? Surely not everyone is overpaying for Canadian real estate.

The bank says it’s about 95 per cent sure that house prices have been overvalued by an average of about 10 per cent since 2007. That’s based on a new forecasting model the bank says it created, which incorporates existing data from private banks and other government institutions.

Huh. 95% Sure? really? I bet it’s all a’cause of those wealthy foreigners right?

And a lot of those inflated house prices are coming at a cost of rising debt loads. About 12 per cent of Canadian households are considered to be extremely indebted — which means they have a debt-to-income ratio of at least 250 per cent. That ratio has doubled since 2000, the report notes.

Oh.

But that’s ok because younger buyers are building equity right?

Young homeowners, the bank added, have become even more vulnerable to negative shocks to income and to higher interest rates.

Wow. What a buzzkill.

*For those who followed the foreigner link we would like to offer our sincerest apologies.  If you are a glutton for punishment, here’s a video of our prime minister singing Guns n’ Roses “Sweet Child o’ Mine“. If you watch the whole thing you earn a cookie! If you cut it off at 3:33 you have to go to work at a Tim Hortons in Fort Mac. You have been warned.