Tag Archives: bonds

Friday Free-for-all! June 30, 2017

It’s the end of another beautiful week. Take a moment to kick back on your yacht and argue about real estate.

It’s Friday Free-for-all time!

Here are a few recent links to kick off the chat for this weekend:

Global bond sell-off
69% chance of july rate hike
CAD$ jumps to 4 month high
We used to be savers
Vacancy tax looms
Condo prices up or down?

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes and have an excellent weekend!

Friday Free-for-all! April 29th 2016

You made it to the end of another work week!

And most of you are still living in Vancouver, which means you love it and find it worth the price. Good job!

With the weekend here it’s time for another Friday Free-for-all, our regular end of the week news link round up and open topic discussion thread for the weekend.  Here are a few links to kick off the chat:

CMHC: Many markets overvalued
Fed leaves rate flat
Donors top up Clarks’ salary
US Ownership rate falls to 48 year low
Who’s at the open house?
How is Comox?
How is Kelowna?
Danger in the bond market

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes here and have an excellent weekend!

Hold cash or leverage up?

This article in the Globe and Mail asks ‘where is the smart money going‘?

Is a drop in oil prices good for the Canadian economy? Will interest rates stay low forever? Nobody knows, but that doesn’t keep us from asking.

Today’s situation amounts to a near total inversion of the markets of a generation ago. “If you look back to, say, 1981, stocks, bonds and real estate were all cheap,” says Jim Giles, chief investment officer at Foresters, a Toronto-based financial services provider with more than $20-billion in assets under management. “Now, the exact opposite is true.”

For investors, this poses a daunting challenge: What do you buy when there’s nothing left to buy – or at least nothing that appears to be a bargain?

For somepeople cash is trash, for others it’s king:

Tim McElvaine, one of Canada’s best-known value investors, has a similar viewpoint. The head of McElvaine Investment Management Ltd. in Victoria is holding about 25 per cent of his fund’s assets in cash, considerably higher than the normal level, as he awaits buying opportunities.

“People will tell you they don’t want to hold cash because it doesn’t yield anything,” he said in an interview. “But the real value of cash is its ability to buy things when prices become attractive.”

Among the reasons to worry about today’s market is that near-zero interest rates have failed to spark any widespread global recovery. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development trimmed its global growth forecast this week to 3.3 per cent for this year, reflecting the euro zone’s continuing woes and a slowing Chinese economy.

Read the full article here.

Pimco talking down Canada again

The worlds biggest bond fund seems to think there’s some sort of an issue with the Canadian real estate market.

Ed Devlin sees a decline somewhere in the range of 10-20 percent for home prices across the nation.

“And if you get that kind of 10-, 20-per-cent real correction, that should alleviate some of the stresses,” he added in an interview with our real estate reporter.

“And so that’s kind of what what we’re seeing. It will start this year, it could be bumpy along the way.”

To be clear, Mr. Devlin is not forecasting a sudden crash, but he joins a chorus of voices, from Deutsche Bank to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, in raising red flags.

Deutsche Bank, for example, believes the Canadian housing market is the most overvalued in the world.

Read the full article here.

The ‘secret’ Canadian bank bailout

You’ve probably noticed lots of eye rolling around here anytime someone mentions how Canadian banks are so different from US banks.  The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is now pointing out in a report that Canadian banks actually received a multibillion dollar bailout from October 2008 to July 2010.  The government is being accused of offering ‘liquidity support’ that is much higher than originally reported.

All told, the study counts $114 billion worth of guarantees and financial aid for Canada’s big banks from government agencies such as the Bank of Canada and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.

MacDonald combed through financial reports from government institutions as well as quarterly reports from the banks themselves.

He says the government has been obfuscating the true cost of supporting the banks.

“A healthy and resilient banking sector cannot operate under a shroud of secrecy. Details of the massive taxpayer support Canadian banks received should be released in the name of transparency and accountability,” MacDonald said.

They also point out that the heads of Canada’s big banks received large raises during the time this ‘liquidity support’ was offered.