Tag Archives: cash

We were right, you should have listened.

Ulsterman dug up this blast from the past: a posting from this here site in 2006.  At that time we recommended Vancouver real estate as the easy road to riches.  If you followed that advice you’re probably reading this now on a solid gold iPad while you recline on silk cushions with your feet in a bath of Diva Vodka. 


 

YOU can GET RICH in REAL ESTATE!

Are you ready to become so INCREDIBLY RICH that you no longer have to adhere to the standards and conventions of ‘civilized’ society? Are you TIRED of eeking out a day-to-day existence while you can smell THE REEK OF WEALTH all around you? Would you like to be able to walk through the mall without any pants and be so EXCESSIVELY WEALTHY that no one can utter a word about your pantless state, lest you unleash your personal squadron of vicious attack lawyers destroying their lives and reputations?

Well NOW you CAN!

Yes! Thanks to the MIRACLE of BOUNDLESS increases in PROPERTY VALUE you can now become a MULTI-MILLIONAIRE by investing in real-estate. And the best thing about it? This process requires NO EXPENSIVE COURSES OR SPECIAL EQUIPMENT. You don’t need any special skills or knowledge – In fact, you don’t even need a brain! THAT JUST HOW EASY IT IS!

Here’s how its done:

1) buy real-estate
2) sell real-estate (for more than you bought it for)
3) repeat and profit!

This SIMPLE MONEY-MAKING PLAN will see you swimming in your own personal GOLDEN BATHTUB filled with 50 dollar bills within a week. Within a month you will have SO MUCH MONEY coming in that you can hire people to MAKE MONEY FOR YOU. Within a year you will be so RICH, so INCREDIBLY WEALTHY that you will be able to buy yourself a SOLID GOLD SPHERE THREE HUNDRED MILES IN DIAMETER!

You will have the power to BUY AND SELL other people for your own amusement. Earth will be your playground and all that hear your name will COWER IN FEAR. So what are you waiting for? GET RICH NOW!

Why am I sharing my MONEY MAKING SECRETS with you? Because I care. I know that you personally have the RIGHT STUFF to dominate the globe and I want you to SUCCEED. And just to show you my generosity, my utter lack of personal greed or selfish motivation, I have just the thing to get you started. It’s a small leaky condo on the east side and it can be your stepping stone to UNLIMITED MIND-BOGGLING RICHES.

 


Remember, it’s never too late to take this advice! It’s entirely free and worth every penny paid! Stop slumping and start Trumping!

Friday Free-for-all! Let’s go weekend!

It’s that time of the week again… Friday Free-for-all time!

This is our regular end of the week news round up and open topic discussion thread for the weekend.

Here are a few recent links to kick off the chat:

Mort. Insurance fees hurt 1st timers?
1/3 new owners use cash from family?
Rates. How low can they go?
Sunshine coast 2014 market summary
No gold watch for you!
BC LNG projects threatened by glut
Economic hit spreads beyond oil patch
Does oil price affect Vancouver RE?
Low rates hurting investors?
Salesman predict decade long boom
Divergence between TSX and financial services
John Bairds new job

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes here and have an excellent weekend!

 

Hold cash or leverage up?

This article in the Globe and Mail asks ‘where is the smart money going‘?

Is a drop in oil prices good for the Canadian economy? Will interest rates stay low forever? Nobody knows, but that doesn’t keep us from asking.

Today’s situation amounts to a near total inversion of the markets of a generation ago. “If you look back to, say, 1981, stocks, bonds and real estate were all cheap,” says Jim Giles, chief investment officer at Foresters, a Toronto-based financial services provider with more than $20-billion in assets under management. “Now, the exact opposite is true.”

For investors, this poses a daunting challenge: What do you buy when there’s nothing left to buy – or at least nothing that appears to be a bargain?

For somepeople cash is trash, for others it’s king:

Tim McElvaine, one of Canada’s best-known value investors, has a similar viewpoint. The head of McElvaine Investment Management Ltd. in Victoria is holding about 25 per cent of his fund’s assets in cash, considerably higher than the normal level, as he awaits buying opportunities.

“People will tell you they don’t want to hold cash because it doesn’t yield anything,” he said in an interview. “But the real value of cash is its ability to buy things when prices become attractive.”

Among the reasons to worry about today’s market is that near-zero interest rates have failed to spark any widespread global recovery. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development trimmed its global growth forecast this week to 3.3 per cent for this year, reflecting the euro zone’s continuing woes and a slowing Chinese economy.

Read the full article here.

BC has the highest personal debt loads

We’re number 1!

The province of British Columbia has the highest level of personal debt anywhere in Canada and it’s still growing.

With incomes low and house prices high, it’s not an entirely unexpected result.  But even if you remove house debt we have very high levels.  Not including mortgage debt, simple consumer debt averages $37,879 in BC.

And that of course has led to a rising number of bankruptcies. In the last four years bankruptcy rates across Canada have gone up 11%, here in BC the number is up 42%.

That Province article also talks about the ‘elation’ of declaring bankruptcy, but that usually only occurs after some one has used up all their other options and burnt up money they could have kept:

“People often come to see a trustee as a last resort, when credit is turned off and they can no longer borrow from one card to pay another,” Mantin says. “They come in and say ‘I regret that I didn’t know about these options sooner. All I’ve done over the last two years is tread water.'”

Frantic people make decisions that will compromise their future, Mantin says. One of the worst is cashing in RRSPs.

For one thing, only the last 12 months of RRSP contributions need be surrendered in a bankruptcy. And those who sacrifice an RRSP without learning to live within a budget are not facing the underlying issue, Mantin says.

“Unless they’re forced to make a behavioural change, I often find they’re in the same position a year or two later,” he says. “They’ve dealt with the short-term debt but haven’t solved the budget problem so they run their debts up again.”

Read the full article here.

Happy buyers don’t have regrets

Are we having fun yet?

If you’re ‘in the game’ you know that the real estate market in Vancouver has been a frothy pond of fun for years.  If you don’t count transaction and renovation costs it’s easy to get rich flipping condos.

Or if you want to get more meta just resell presales contracts.

That’s right, we have people here who will buy the right to buy a building that doesn’t exist yet!

The funny thing about easy money is that it seems so unreal. This city is filled with people who could easily cash out even at current post peak prices and have a big chunk of real money, but will the majority do that?

Nope. The majority will stay put, renovate, buy back into the same market or turn their home equity into more debt via a HELOC.

In fact the majority couldn’t all cash out even if they wanted, we simply don’t have the buyers to enable that. Even when we had bidding wars we didn’t have enough buyers for a majority to cash out and now that sales have plummeted we really don’t have enough buyers.

A few lucky sellers will cash out and make money off this bubble. Likely because life changes caused them to move on. The majority will keep on paying their mortgages or get foreclosed on. Recent buyers will be paying more to keep their homes and may start to feel a bit trapped.

You saw this here just a couple years ago when buyers were complaining that developers were selling condos in their building for less than they paid and developers were suing presales buyers for money to cover the difference between their deposit and the lower resales value.

But you know what? They’ll be fine, they payed the price they felt their home was worth to them. A market decline doesn’t hurt someone that is happy with the price they payed and can keep paying their bills.

And if rates go up or job losses occur? Well someone without a financial buffer and emergency savings to deal with such a scenario really wasn’t ready to buy a house in the first place.