Tag Archives: equity

30% of retirees return to work to pay bills

ING has released the results of a survey they did showing that 3 out of 10 retired Canadians ended up having to return to work to pay bills.

Many retirees simply hadn’t saved enough or underestimated the cost of living.

The surveys portray a notable disconnect between Canadians’ expectations of life after the workforce and the reality of the cost.

ING Direct said that respondents wished they had found more ways to save for retirement, that they had started saving earlier and hadn’t “spent money so mindlessly.”

“The reality of retirement for many Canadians is a sobering reminder that you can’t put your financial future on the back burner,” ING Direct president and CEO Peter Aceto said in a release.

“Among the many other financial priorities we face during our prime working years, we need to make sure that retirement planning doesn’t get overlooked.”

So how are your retirement plans dear reader? Are you betting it all on a house in Vancouver?  Are you just starting out and saving and investing, or are you finding it difficult to put enough aside for your golden years?

How much lost on a 2009 condo purchase?

Previously we highlighted b5baxters comment on the 19 months that have elapsed since Vancouver home prices have peaked (according to the REBGV home price index)

Of course there are a lot of variables in the housing market, so lets look just at condos, which Crabman has ever so helpfully run the numbers on:

I calculated the bottom line if someone bought a benchmark condo 4 years ago with a 10% DP and a 4% 30-yr mortgage. I took into account all carrying costs, rent savings and principal pay down. I also assumed rent, prop tax and condo fees increased 4%/year.

Oct 2009:
Benchmark price: $380,975
Mortgage balance: $342,878
Equity: $38,098 (10%)
Est. Rent: $1,100
Mortgage: $1,637
Condo Fees: $200
Prop tax: $89
Monthly loss: $826 (extra costs of owning vs. renting)

Oct 2013:
Benchmark price: $365,600
Mortgage balance: $317,253
Equity: $48,347 (13.2%)
Est. Rent: $1,287
Mortgage: $1,637
Condo Fees: $234
Prop tax: $104
Monthly loss: $688

Over those 4 years, equity only increased $10,249. But the extra monthly costs of ownership over that same period were $45,498, so the owner would have saved $35,249 by renting.

So it looks like the current ‘ownership premium’ for someone who bought a Vancouver condo in 2009 is just over $35k.  Anybody see any problems with those numbers?

When mommy and daddy help you buy.

It’s hard to buy your first place.

Thats why more and more parents are chipping in to help junior get their feet in the real estate market.

“The (housing) market would have been much weaker if we didn’t have this phenomenon. There’s no question about that,” says Tal, deputy chief economist of CIBC World Markets.

“I’d say this generation is getting more help than any other generation did, but I’d say they need this help more than any generation, too.”

Interest rates may be keeping monthly payments relatively affordable, but the big issue for young first-time buyers has been coming up with sizable downpayments when the average price of a home in the GTA is now more than $534,000 — more than $850,000 for a detached in the City of Toronto — almost double the $293,000 they averaged just a decade ago.

Saving can be especially tough when many first-time buyers are still paying off student loans and dealing with rents that can run from $1,100 to more than $2,000 a month.

Read the full article in the The Star.

Close your eyes and load up on debt

This National Post commentary is one of the most direct attacks on Canadian personal debt levels I’ve seen in the mainstream media.

The takeaway is this: YOU are responsible for your own debts, don’t go whining to anyone if it gets you into trouble.

It’s mindboggling to think that an entire population can look at what happened in the US when personal debt levels got this high and shrug it off.

Analysts and economist are filled with forecasts of doom, and that was before the latest figures showed debt had continue to pile up over the past year to a record 163% of household income, which is where the U.S. was before the 2008 collapse, and about 10 points higher than anyone thought. As the housing market cools and home prices slip, a lot of people could find themselves making monthly payments they can barely cover for a house that isn’t worth what they thought it was. If you can’t cover the mortgage, you just have to pray the roof doesn’t start leaking or the furnace fail.

And borrowers won’t really have anyone to blame but themselves. The warnings are out there. The examples are rife: all anyone has to do is examine the experience of U.S. homeowners over the past few years. The dangers aren’t a secret, they’re just being ignored.

But people keep borrowing, because it makes them feel good to spend, because they’re too busy to think about it, because they figure they can cover the payments in the short term and will deal with the future when it comes. And because they can always blame it on someone else when the roof caves in.

Read the full article here.

Is financing getting tougher for the self employed?

It seems that more and more Canadians are self employed.

The self employed tend to have less steady income then full time employees and as a group it can be more difficult to get a mortgage or refinancing.

As a self-employed website developer who had recently restructured his business, Greg Schmidt knew that refinancing his mortgage wasn’t going to be a piece of cake.

“I had a little bit of a line of credit built up from shifting the focus of the business and my car lease had come up for being bought out, so I needed money to take care of that,” said Mr. Schmidt, a single 42-year-old who owns a home in Toronto that includes an apartment for income. “It turned out the best way to go was to do a new mortgage, increase the amount of the old one and take care of those costs.”

However, when he approached his bank, he was told “the numbers didn’t work for them.”

Read the full article in the Globe and Mail.