Tag Archives: income

Vancouver Realtor Hunger Index November 2014

RFM has updated the Vancouver Realtor Hunger Index for November 2014 over at Vancouverpeak.com

The index is creeping up from its mid levels, but nothing too dramatic at this point.

The VANCOUVER REALTOR HUNGER INDEX for November 2014 was 62%. How does this compare? The 17-year average for November is 54%. At 62%, the 2014 November VRHI equaled 1999’s figure and was higher than 10 years and lower than 5 years since 1998.

Details and comparison data for 17 years at:http://vancouverpeak.com/showthread.php?tid=64

BC Ferries: Losing money by cutting service

Think of the money the government could save by closing down the Trans Canada highway! No more expensive road maintenance, and the land could be sold off to build more condos!

…Of course there may be some negatives associated with closing that highway.

Here on the coast much of our province is across water, which means the transportation system we rely on is BC Ferries.

An economic analysis shows that the expected $725k savings from recent cuts is actually causing a loss of $870k in tax revenues as tourism plunges $3.9 million following deep service cuts.

About one in five tourism- ism-based businesses in the Coast-Chilcotin region report foreclosure is a near-term possibility.

More than 40 per cent report losing most or all of their tourist bookings when agencies couldn’t sell the Discovery Coast package due to worries over ferry service.

And three in four businesses report decreased income in the year after the service cuts, according to the report by Larose Research Strategy.

Read the full article here.

Hold cash or leverage up?

This article in the Globe and Mail asks ‘where is the smart money going‘?

Is a drop in oil prices good for the Canadian economy? Will interest rates stay low forever? Nobody knows, but that doesn’t keep us from asking.

Today’s situation amounts to a near total inversion of the markets of a generation ago. “If you look back to, say, 1981, stocks, bonds and real estate were all cheap,” says Jim Giles, chief investment officer at Foresters, a Toronto-based financial services provider with more than $20-billion in assets under management. “Now, the exact opposite is true.”

For investors, this poses a daunting challenge: What do you buy when there’s nothing left to buy – or at least nothing that appears to be a bargain?

For somepeople cash is trash, for others it’s king:

Tim McElvaine, one of Canada’s best-known value investors, has a similar viewpoint. The head of McElvaine Investment Management Ltd. in Victoria is holding about 25 per cent of his fund’s assets in cash, considerably higher than the normal level, as he awaits buying opportunities.

“People will tell you they don’t want to hold cash because it doesn’t yield anything,” he said in an interview. “But the real value of cash is its ability to buy things when prices become attractive.”

Among the reasons to worry about today’s market is that near-zero interest rates have failed to spark any widespread global recovery. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development trimmed its global growth forecast this week to 3.3 per cent for this year, reflecting the euro zone’s continuing woes and a slowing Chinese economy.

Read the full article here.

Oct 2014 Vancouver Realtor Hunger Index at 54%

RFM has updated the Vancouver Realtor Hunger Index which currently stands at 54%.

That takes it almost squarely into the middle of historical data:

The VANCOUVER REALTOR HUNGER INDEX for October 2014 was 54%. How does this compare? The 17-year average for October is 50%. At 54%, the 2014 October VRHI was higher than 8 years and lower than 8 years since 1998.

Details and comparison data for 17 years at: http://vancouverpeak.com/showthread.php?tid=64

Here’s how that number is calculated:

I start with the total reported sales from the REBGV. I assume 5% of those sales were ‘double ended’ (one realtor kept the entire commission by ‘representing’ both buyer and seller) and add to the number of ‘double ended’ commissions the number of split commissions (which I reduce by an assumed 15% ‘earned’ by realtors who handled multiple sales). I divide the resulting number of commissions by the total number of realtors and subtract that fraction from 1 to yield the percent of realtors not earning commissions and therefore going hungry. In symbols: (((sales x .05) + (sales x 1.615))/(# realtors)) – 1 = VRHI; (1.615 = .95 x 2 x .85). The REBGV website reveals neither the exact number of realtors at any particular time nor the percent actively engaged in selling residential property. I used 11,000 for 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011; 10,000 for 2010, 9,400 for 2009, 9,500 for 2008, 9,000 for 2007, 8,200 for 2006, 7,800 for 2005, 7,100 for 2004, 6,700 for 2003, 6,500 for 2002, 6,700 for 2001, 7,200 for 2000, 7,800 for 1999 and 8,500 for 1998.

The best way to make money in Real Estate

Looks like somebody has figured out the easiest and best way to make tons of money in Real Estate.

It’s not buying and flipping condos, it’s not renting out rooms and sheds, it’s not even as a developer building towers or a realtor taking a commission on each sale.

No, all those things would take way too much work.

The best way we’ve ever seen to get rich off of real estate is simple: sell your name to developers.

This way you take no risk in the market and make money no matter what happens.

So what are you waiting for? Get selling!