Tag Archives: jobs

Oil Prices drive Shell to cut Canadian Jobs

Shell is cutting hundreds of jobs in Alberta as oil price drops change everything.

Already, some companies have put longer-term oil sands projects on hold until markets stabilize, which analysts say may not start to happen until at least midway through 2015. And service industries that support the sector have cut jobs as business has slowed.

Northern Alberta’s oil sands have among the highest development costs in global energy, so operations are particularly vulnerable to skidding crude prices. North American benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude fell 43 cents to $48.36 a barrel on Friday, down from more than $100 in June.

Shell said it is laying off less than 10 per cent of the 3,000 workers at the Albian Sands project, one of five major oil sands mining ventures.

A spokesman for the company declined to give exact job-loss numbers, but a labour official in Fort McMurray, who does not represent Shell workers, pegged them at around 200.

Read the full article here.

House prices driving away key workers?

High housing prices in Vancouver are driving away the key working demographic of 25-40 year olds – more are moving to other provinces than moving in from other provinces.

This article was pointed out by crikey.

Despite the challenges, numerous companies interviewed by Reuters said most of their staff are willing to make sacrifices — like long commutes or raising kids in shoebox condos — for the benefit of Vancouver’s mild climate and outdoor lifestyle.

But those same companies, such as Vancouver-based retailer Mountain Equipment Co-op, also had examples of key hires who ultimately turned down jobs because of the high home prices.

It’s an issue Craig Hemer, an executive recruiter with Boyden, has been grappling with for the better part of a decade.

Hemer has learned ways to soften the blow — selling older executives on the idea of downsizing to a luxurious downtown condo and convincing those with families that suburban life offers more amenities for kids.

And how do the companies react to this challenge?

Companies too are shifting their policies, with some offering car allowances and transit subsidies. Others are opening small suburban offices or allow staff to telecommute from home.

But that isn’t always enough, especially in Vancouver’s start-up scene. Executives say it is easy enough to hire junior staff, but a dearth of experienced engineers and technology workers makes it hard to grow past a certain point.

“There’s just not enough high calibre people here. They all leave when they realize they can make more money in other cities and live there for cheaper,” said Simeon Garratt, chief executive of Spark CRM, a property-focused tech start-up.

“We debate at least once a month whether we should just move to Toronto.”

Read the full article here.

Vancouver and Toronto ‘Desperation’ cities?

Over at the Globe and Mail Rob Carrick points out that real estate is expensive in Calgary, Toronto and Vancouver calling them ‘Desperation cities‘.

But let’s get real.  Not being able to afford a condo isn’t a ‘desperate’ circumstance.

Maybe it’s the fall out of overpaying he’s talking about though…

The theme in housing market forecasts for 2015 so far is steady pricing. Some markets will more or less be flat, while the Big Three markets could rise 3 to 4 per cent. What more could go wrong if you’re struggling to save enough money to buy a first home? Here’s something: You buy and then have to deal with a shock to the economy. Something like a plunge in oil prices that undermines growth and hurts the job market, for example.

In any case if you have shelter, enough food and the company of loved ones you’re pretty lucky on a global scale.  Maybe you’d be happier with granite countertops, but then again maybe you wouldn’t.

 

CMHC cutting jobs, laying off employees

Joining in that venerable tradition of holiday season layoffs, the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation has announced that it is cutting 215 jobs which is close to 10% of it’s workforce.

But of course this is government, so they will also be adding jobs, resulting in only a small net loss of positions:

The federal agency said Friday the employees have been declared surplus and will see their jobs disappear at both CMHC’s head office in Ottawa and its regional operations.

However, CMHC says it is adding to its staff in risk management and information technology, so the organization will only see a “small net reduction” in its overall staffing levels.

Read the full article here.

What’s plan B for the economy?

BC really hasn’t done so bad for itself by digging stuff up from the ground and selling it to other countries, but as prices change in that market it can leave our economy somewhat wanting.

For example:

This week, we discovered just how far the B.C. government was prepared to cave in order to assuage proponents like Petronas. It effectively cut the royalty tax it first talked about in half.

Now ‘free money’ is still free money, but anytime your income is cut in half its a bit of a downer.

So whats plan B to diversify the BC economy?  Gary Mason says there is no plan B and Patriotz says ‘what about real estate‘? But isn’t the RE market a bit played out at this point?

Most middle class RE purchases in Vancouver have gained less than a GIC over the last four years, and there’s the risk that high home prices chase away more productive industries.

So how does BC grow its economy in the future? If resources take a dive, what our best hope as a province to compete on a national and global scale?