Tag Archives: marketing

Rent to own?

At least one local developer has struck on an ‘innovative’ way to rent out their property: rent to own.

Just like TV and Furniture in the 80s, you can rent to own a condo.

Under the plan, 15 per cent of a tenant’s monthly rent goes into a credit account. That money can then be used in the future for a down payment on a new Bosa home purchase, to a maximum of three per cent of the home’s value.

This should appeal to someone who is having difficulty finding a unit for 15% less and putting the money away themselves.

FFFA! It’s Friday again!

Well well, look at that, you made it to the end of another work week.

This is Friday and that means it’s time for another Friday Free-for-all, our regular end of the week news round up and open topic discussion thread for the the weekend.

Here are a few recent links to kick of the chat:

Can the industry police itself?
Ultimate buy / rent calculator
Boom a bust for heritage buildings
Canada job market not quite best
Leaving the city for better economics
Tiny homes
Is the worst over for Looney?

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes here and have an excellent weekend!

FFFA! Rentals, Repairs, Indexes

Hey it’s the end of another work week!

And if you’ve been here before you know what that means: It’s Friday Free-for-all time!

This when we do our end of the week news round up and open topic discussion thread for the weekend, here are a few links to kick off the chat:

Why don’t you buy already?
Marketing! Buzzwords!
Record debt, but no worries
Include transportation costs
And maintenance costs
Toronto beats Vancouver in crazy?
Vancouver island buyer or seller market?

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes here and have an excellent weekend!

REDMA changes, is this a big deal?

Ex-kitsie pointed out this story:

Justice Minister Susan Anton has introduced Bill 17 (Miscellaneous Amendment Act, 2014) which includes a proposed amendment to Section 23 of the Real Estate Development Marketing Act (REDMA).

Ex-kitsie explains:

This is the legislation that governs the marketing of real estate by developers to consumers. The amendment would make a purchase agreement enforceable against a purchaser where the developer’s disclosure agreement included misrepresentation of a material fact and the developer was not aware of the misrepresentation at the time the agreement was entered into. This amendment would remove the ability of the purchaser to terminate or renegotiate the agreement upon discovery of the misrepresentation. So… the developer can include unsubstantiated inaccuracies while still enforcing the purchase agreement against the purchaser who relied upon the misrepresentation. Of course, we all know developers would never lie.

We’re not sure if this is a big deal or not, here’s a link to the amendment, you’ll have to scroll down about half way to find the relevant section.  Any comments on whether this is a dramatic change to the Real Estate Development Marketing Act or just a minor adjustment?


Down is the new flat in Vancouver and Victoria

A ‘flat’ market sounds good right?

Not too up, not too down, but just right.

It means if you buy a condo now you won’t have to suffer the indignity of someone buying the unit upstairs from you for $100k less in the future.

So flat is comfortable and we’re starting to see that word a lot more these days.  This article uses it in the headline: Vancouver condo market stays flat.

So you might be surprised to read the following directly under that headline:

Although Vancouver has a reputation as one of the most expensive cities in North America for housing, condo prices stayed flat or even dropped last year, according to recently released assessment numbers.

That follows several years of the same pattern, which means overall condo prices are now seven to eight per cent lower in inflation-adjusted dollars than they were at the recent peak of the condo market in 2009, says one analyst.

Meanwhile in the capital city they’re using the same word: Flat forecast for Greater Victoria home prices.

And here’s what they say:

Although the number of homes sold for the past year rose by four per cent to 5,998 from 5,747 in 2012, the benchmark price for a single-family house slid by 3.2 per cent. That benchmark, representing a typical house, was $479,599 in December, down from $495,400 during the same month in 2012, the board said Thursday.

The benchmark price has dropped from three years ago when it was $515,500, the board said. And it’s lower than the $483,400 price recorded five years ago.

So here’s the cheat sheet:

Vancouver ‘flat’ = 7-8% drop over four years.

Victoria ‘flat’ = $35,901 drop over three years.