Tag Archives: rate

Who wants a 50 cent dollar?

With rumors of another rate cut, Rob Carrick points out 8 reasons he thinks that’s a bad idea. The very first reason? The Looney will fall even further against the US dollar.

For eight years, the Bank of Canada has been trying to encourage economic growth by lowering interest rates. It’s so not working.

In fact, lower rates are hurting a lot of people more than they’re helping. We have to at least acknowledge this as speculation of yet another rate cut grows. It could come as soon as Wednesday, which is the date of the next rate announcement from the Bank of Canada.

The central bank considers the entire economy when it sets rates. Now, let’s look at things from the point of view of everyday people. Here are eight reasons why the Bank of Canada shouldn’t cut rates any lower.

1. The dollar will fall even more: The most disruptive force in personal finance right now is the falling dollar. That’s because it’s hitting us all in a vulnerable spot – our grocery bill. Helpful for exporters, a weak loonie is a tax on families and snowbirds who must change Canadian dollars into U.S. currency. Last week, the dollar fell below 70 cents (U.S.) for the first time since 2003. A lower dollar adds downward momentum.

Read the full list over at the Globe and Mail, although a number of them are directly connected to a dropping looney.

The one group that a dropping looney should help are exporters as their products get cheaper for foreign buyers, but Jayson Myers, the head of the countries largest exporters association says don’t bother.

“Interest rates are low already. A little bit of dollar stability would be better.”

As an interesting aside, in 2002 when the CAD was hitting record lows Treasury Board President Scott Brison said it was

“a pay cut to every Canadian, a drop in our standard of living and a reflection of the fact that Canadians are getting poorer as Americans are getting richer under the watch of the government,”

Scott Brison is now a key cabinet minister and top economic aide to Trudeau.

 A hat-tip to southseacompany for the links.

3.5% Fed rate in 2017?

Here’s a prediction:

“US interest rates will rise – and hit 3.5pc by the end of 2017”, The Telegraph UK

“A momentous change looms large in the US. It seems highly likely that the US Federal Reserve will raise interest rates this week.”

“What makes the probable rise in interest rates so significant is not the size of the increase. The rate rise is likely to be a mere 0.25pc. But this would represent the first rate increase for nearly 10 years. Moreover, we all know that once rates have begun to rise, usually the process does not stop after only one increase.”

Does anyone believe we’ll see a rate increase by the Fed from 0.25% to 3.5% in the next two years?

FFFA! Rate, Drop, Evaluate, Condos

It’s that time of the week again!

Time for another Friday Free-for-all.

This is our regular end of the week news roundup and open topic discussion thread for the weekend.

Here are a few recent links to kick off the chat:

Poloz: long term rates headed up
Evaluate my condo deal
Condo Market Report
Vancouver housing drop song
10 reasons the gold bugs lost their shirts

So what are you seeing out there? Post your news links, thoughts and anecdotes here and have an excellent weekend!

Mortgage rates rise at RBC, more to follow?

Looks like RBC just upped two of it’s mortgage rates by one fifth of a point.

What will we do without our record low mortgage rates?

It’s probably just a minor fluctuation, but other banks are expected to follow as bond yields have edged up in the last month.

So if you want to do a rate lock in now might be the time.

Helmut Pastrick of Central One Credit Union explains:

“Sentiment has improved with respect to Europe and the economic outlook,” Pastrick said. “The economic news was quite negative for a period of weeks and now it is somewhat less negative.”

RBC’s posted rate for a three-year, fixed-rate mortgage will go up 0.2 percentage points to 4.05 per cent. Meanwhile, an RBC special-offer rate for five-year closed mortgages rises to 3.69 per cent.

The rise in the cost of funds for banks will mean other lenders will probably also raise their rates, or absorb some of the cost increase to hold onto or gain market share,” Pastrick said.

Read the full article over at the Vancouver Sun.

 

Scotiabank ends 2.99 mortgage deal early, more tightening on the way?

Wow, it seems like it was just a few days ago we were talking about newly introduced teaser-level mortgage rates offered by Canadian banks.

… oh, it was just a few days ago.

BMO kicked off the competition and TD, Scotia and CIBC jumped in with competing lowball offers.

Well it looks like Scotiabank blinked first.  Their special offer didn’t even last a week.  Canadian Mortgage Trends is reporting that Scotiabank has pulled their special offer for a 2.99% rate.  Guess we’ll have to wait to see if the other banks will follow.

And speaking of mortgages, Canadian Mortgage Trends also has some interesting analysis of the OSFI recommendations for underwriting practices and how it’s about to lead to mortgages that are a bit tougher to get.

After reading through 18 pages of changes in detail, our immediate reaction was frankly, concern.

That’s not because the guidelines are greatly imprudent. Some are unnecessarily rigid, but most are sound policy.

It’s because OSFI risks tightening too much, too fast.